Lunchtime Sessions

ALL TIMES LISTED ARE MOUNTAIN TIME (MT)

Dec
16
Wed
Learning How to Become a Leader
Dec 16 @ 12:15 pm – 1:15 pm

Session Chair: David Lopez, UTMB

Purpose: To empower the next generation of young epidemiologist to think themselves as leaders and to take the initiative to assume more leadership roles. Importance: The future of the Society for Epidemiologic Research (SER) relies on the next generation of young epidemiologist. By empowering the next generation of epidemiologists with leadership skills as individuals and public health professionals will benefit their professional careers, communities and the mission of the SER. The goal is to initiate a mind shift from public health consumers to global leaders. Format: We will present the seven topics below and unpack the meaning of each other related to developing leadership skills. However, this is an open-ended “ask anything” type of format.

Panelists:
Sonia Hernandez-Diaz, Harvard University
Stephanie Smith-Warner, Harvard University
Onyebuchi Arah, UCLA
Mehta Shruti, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health
Stephen Gilman, NIH

Livin’ on the Edge – Doing and Teaching Epidemiology Outside Top-Ranked Schools of Public Health
Dec 16 @ 12:15 pm – 1:15 pm

Session Chair: Eric Lofgren, Washington State University

As the basic science of public health, epidemiology is taught in a wide variety of contexts, from large schools of public health to informal seminars and workshops in other departments. In the spirit of increasing the diversity of the SER Annual Meeting, including representation from a broader range of institutional settings, this symposium delves into the issues and experiences of epidemiologists teaching in less conventional situations. It will explore issues ranging from student recruitment and curriculum development to articulating – and defending – the role of epidemiological research and teaching in a broader biomedical context.

Presenters:
Nadia Abuelezam, Boston College
“Nursing the Numbers: Epidemiology in a School of Nursing”

Rebecca Smith, University of Illinois
“Of Humans and Other Animals: Epidemiology in a Veterinary College”

Eric Lofgren, Washington State University
“Where the Wet Labs Are: Epidemiology in a Basic Science Heavy Department”

Christina Ludema, University of Georgia
“How Low Can You Go? Epidemiology for Undergrads”

Julia Simard, Stanford University
“No Scrubs: Epidemiology in a Medical School”

Masters-Level Professionals in Academia, Integrated Healthcare, Consulting Companies, & Healthcare Technology
Dec 16 @ 12:15 pm – 1:15 pm

Session Co-Chair: Susan Diaz, National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Session Co-Chair: Erin Bowles, Kaiser Permanente

SER has a genuine commitment towards supporting and promoting their Masters-level professional membership. The SER 2019 inaugural, Masters-Level Symposium was very well received. Sponsored by the SER Membership & Nominations Committee, this 2020 session has been expanded to two sessions.

This session highlights career pathways of Masters-Level SER members in the areas of academia, integrated healthcare, consulting companies, and healthcare technology. We have recruited panelists from both academic and non-academic organizations (CDC, NIH, CEIP, VA) to provide a wide variety of perspectives to attendees. Panelists will provide brief overviews of their careers as master’s level epidemiologists and attendees will have opportunities to ask questions and engage in discussion.

The overall objective of these two sessions is to highlight the valuable contribution of Masters-level professionals in the area of Epidemiologic Research, foster their professional growth inside and outside of SER, and demonstrate SER’s devotion to this esteemed portion of the Membership.

Presenters:
Ruth Geller, Massachusetts General Hospital
“Masters-Level Epidemiologist at an Academic Medical Center & Member, SER Mentoring Committee”

Mrudula Naidu, New York University
“Masters-Level Biostatistician at an Academic Medical Center”

Chad Coleman, Henry Ford Health System
“Masters-Level Epidemiologist at an Integrated Healthcare”

Megan Kemp, GZA
“Masters-Level, Environmental Epidemiologist/Toxicologist at a Consulting Company”

Mandy Kelly, Harvard University
“Masters-Level, Senior Scientist at a Healthcare Technology Company”

Rapid Updates on Public Health Emergencies
Dec 16 @ 12:15 pm – 1:15 pm

Session Chair: Joanna Merckx, McGill University

In this session you will receive pertinent updates on the content and state of some selected health emergencies. The WHO declared ten threats to global health, including air pollution and climate change, antimicrobial resistance and vaccine hesitancy. New emergencies, related to both infectious and non-infectious diseases, appear and “old” diseases re-emerge. The session aims to provide substantive briefings from content experts on the epidemiology of these emergencies and resume the facts and figures of the scope and its magnitude. If you want to get updated on some hot topics in public health today, then attend our 10 minute briefings that will summarize the defined emergencies, in time and space, the threshold reached, major gaps and current actions formulated for its response. We will include the opioid crisis, E-cigarette, or vaping, product use–associated lung injury, re-emerging vaccine-preventable infectious diseases, antimicrobial resistance and the by climate change driven expanding range of arthropod vectors and related spread of infectious diseases.

Presenters:
Saad Omer, Yale University
“Epidemiology of Measles: A Potentially Re-emerging Disease”

Kacey Ernst, University of Arizona
“Complexities in Identifying Climate Change Associations and Predicting Future Risk of Vector-Borne Diseases”

Joanna Merckx, McGill University
“AMR: Update on the Global Failure of Antimicrobials”

Alyssa Harlow, Boston University
“The E-Cigarette, or Vaping, Product Use-Associated Lung Injury Outbreak”

Brandon Marshall, Brown University
“One Shot Update on the Epidemiology of the Overdose Crisis in North America”

Recruitment Fair
Dec 16 @ 12:15 pm – 1:15 pm
Dec
17
Thu
Changes in Academic Publishing and Peer Review
Dec 17 @ 12:15 pm – 1:15 pm

Session Co-Chair: Rachael Stolzenberg, NIH
Session Co-Chair: Nichole Austin, McGill University

The number of new journals has grown dramatically over the past two decades, providing authors more options for where to publish their work. Unfortunately, this growth has been accompanied by an increase in predatory journals and renewed interest in the profit model for academic publishing, whereby authors provide research outputs and peer review, and publishers keep the copyright and profit out of proportion to their value added. There is ongoing concern about publication bias and poor replicability given the enduring prioritization of statistically significant findings and because certain findings – for example, results from high visibility studies – are more likely to get published. There are also challenges in obtaining appropriate peer reviewers to review manuscripts. Numerous changes to academic publishing and peer review have been proposed and experimented with to deal with these issues, including open access and not-for-profit journals, pre-registration of studies, inviting outside authors to write discussion sections, post-publication and open peer review, publishing on pre-print servers and registered reports, and Plan S, which may mark a noteworthy shift in publication practices. These experiments have the potential to transform academic publishing, but it is not clear which, if any, are most likely to make an impact. In this lunchtime panel discussion session you have the chance to hear from experts in academic publishing to talk about the future as they see it.

Presenters:
Enrique Schisterman, NIH
Christina Snyder, Oxford University Press
Elizabeth Platz, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health

ESI-Research Agenda
Dec 17 @ 12:15 pm – 1:15 pm

Session Chair: Magdalena Cerda, New York University

Life-course Epidemiological Research in Brazil
Dec 17 @ 12:15 pm – 1:15 pm

Session Co-Chair: Moyses Szklo, JHSPH
Session Co-Chair: Paulo Lotufo, University of Sao Paulo

Epidemiologic transition is a concept first used by Omran to explore the complex change in patterns of health and disease. In Brazil, number of deaths due to infectious diseases the past six decades, infectious diseases were a public health problem. Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have become a major health priority in Brazil – 72% of all deaths were attributable to NCDs in 2007. From this point of view, our proposal is to present the new frontiers in the early life course epidemiology developed in Brazil. Therefore, our proposal is to describe the double burden of infectious diseases and NCDs in Brazil, and present a life course approach on NCD epidemiology based on information from several observational studies carried out in Brazil: 1st . Prolonged and polarized epidemiological transition: coexistence of infectious diseases and NCDs: Marcia C Castro; 2nd . Population-based birth cohorts in Brazil: from the first 1,000 days to the first 15,000 days: César G. Victora; 3rd . Youth/Child cardiometabolic health, lifestyle behavior and associated environmental factors in Brazilian populations: Augusto César F. De Moraes; 4th . Factors related to cardiovascular health in adulthood: Paulo Lotufo; 5th . Determinants of late-life cognition: Claudia Suemoto.

Presenters:
Marcia Castro, Harvard University
“Prolonged and polarized epidemiological transition: coexistence of infectious diseases and NCDs”

Cesar Victora, JHSPH
“Population-based birth cohorts in Brazil: from the first 1,000 days to the first 15,000 days”

Augusto Cesar Ferreira De Moraes, University of Sao Paulo
“Youth/Child cardiometabolic health lifestyle behavior and associated environmental factors in Brazilian populations”

Paulo Lotufo, University of Sao Paulo
“Factors related to cardiovascular health in adulthood”

Isabela Bensenor, University of Sao Paulo
“Thyroid function in Brazil: perspectives of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)”

SPC Career Panel
Dec 17 @ 12:15 pm – 1:15 pm

Session Co-Chair: Precious Esie, Columbia University
Session Co-Chair: Matthew Mietchen, Washington State University

“Please join the Student & Post-Doc Committee (SPC) during this lunchtime session where panelists from academia, government, and the private sector will share experiences and advice from their career trajectories. Panelists will introduce themselves describing their expertise and experience, and then the session will be opened for audience questions and discussion.”

Panelists:
Dayna Johnson, Emory University
Tsegaselassie Workalemahu, University of Utah
Theresa Chapple-McGruder, AMCHP
Justin Lessler, Johns Hopkins University
Sarah Rhea, RTI International

Speed Mentoring for Epidemiologists Considering Returning to School to Pursue Doctoral Studies
Dec 17 @ 12:15 pm – 1:15 pm

Session Co-Chair: Susan Diaz, International Consortium for Blood Safety (ICBS)
Session Co-Chair: Erin Bowles, Kaiser Permanente

SER has a genuine commitment towards supporting and promoting their Masters-level professional membership. The SER 2019 inaugural, Masters-Level Symposium was very well received. Sponsored by the SER Membership & Nominations Committee, this 2020 session has been expanded to two sessions.

This session is dedicated to supporting SER Masters-level students and professionals contemplating returning to school to pursue Doctoral Studies. In the SER Masters-level survey in 2017, 24.4% planned to return to school to pursue Doctoral Studies (DrPH/PhD). In a speed-mentoring format, forty, pre-registered, attendees will receive mentoring from working, Masters-Level Professionals, as well as from those whom decided to return to school to pursue Doctorate degrees (DrPH/PhD/ScD). The event will have 1-2 mentors at small tables who will engage in a brief discussion with mentees at that table. The mentors will rotate tables to engage in discussions with a new group of mentees every 10-15 minutes.

The overall objective of these two sessions is to highlight the valuable contribution of Masters-level professionals in the area of Epidemiologic Research, foster their professional growth inside and outside of SER, and demonstrate SER’s devotion to this esteemed portion of the Membership.

Presenters:
Tess Gilbert, Veterans Affairs
“Masters-Level Epidemiologist in Government, at the Federal Level (VA)”

Tanya Libby, University of California Berkeley
“Masters-Level, CDC Foodnet Epidemiologist in Government, at the State Level (CEIP)”

Rebecca Ehrenkranz, Pittsburgh University
“Masters-Level, Surveillance Epidemiologist in Government, at the Federal Level (NIH/NCI) & Current Doctoral Student in Epidemiology (Pitt SPH)”

Nedghie Adrien, Boston University
“Masters-Level Epidemiologist in Government, at the Federal Level (CDC Foundation) & Current Doctoral Student in Epidemiology (BUSPH)”

Reese Sy, Boston University
“Former Data Analyst in Brain Injury Research at an Academic Center & Current Graduate Research Fellow/Doctoral Student in Epidemiology (BUSPH)”

Rachael Ross, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
“Former Masters-Level Epidemiologist at an Academic Medical Center (CHOP) & Current Doctoral Student in Epidemiology (UNC SPH)”

Robert C. Orellana, CDC
“Doctoral-Level Epidemiologist in the Federal Government & Former Epidemiologist at the State Level”

Dr. Babatunde Oloyede, United States Public Health Service Commander and Clinical Epidemiologist
“Masters-Level, Reproductive Health Epidemiologist in Government, at the Federal Level (CDC)”

Nnaemeka Odo, Exponent
“Physician & Doctoral-Level Epidemiologist in Environmental & Occupational Health at a Consulting Company”

Kristin Palmsten, HealthPartners
“Doctoral-Level, Research Investigator at a Research Institute”

Anne Mobley Butler, Washington University in St. Louis
“Doctoral-Level, Professor of Medicine in Infectious Diseases, at a Medical School”

The American Journal of (Social) Epidemiology Panel
Dec 17 @ 12:15 pm – 1:15 pm

Session Co-Chair: Maria Glymour, University of California, San Francisco
Session Co-Chair: Ichiro Kawachi, Harvard University

“The American Journal of Epidemiology has a long track record of publishing articles that have defined our field conceptually and engaged with its ongoing challenges.  Currently, nearly one-third of annual submissions to the Journal address the social determinants of health, positioning the journal well to continue in its leadership role in promoting the science of social epidemiology. In this session, members of the AJE Board will discuss their vision of the future of the journal as a leading venue for showcasing the most cutting edge science from our field.”

Presenters:
Stephen Gilman, NIH/NICHD
Gina Lovasi, Drexel University
Arjumand Siddiqi, University of Toronto
Chanelle Howe, Brown University