SERforum

 

Join Andrew Olshan, for SERforum Live!

“Career and Professional Development”

JOIN SERforum – Live
December 5th, 12pm EST

 

Do you ever find yourself struggling to figure out a question about epidemiologic methods, or other topics in epidemiology, and don’t know who to ask? The SERforum allows for individuals to answer questions that come up in our daily work around substantive and methodological topics in epidemiology.
 
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SERforum - Live with Dr. Andrew Olshan

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Hi Andy,

hope you are having fun! I wish I had you giving me advice when I started but I wonder if you have any ideas on what should anybody do on their first year as assistant professor? thanks for doing this!

Enrique

 

Can you also please talk about how one can build collaborations? Thanks!

Quote from Enrique on December 5, 2018, 10:43 am

Hi Andy,

hope you are having fun! I wish I had you giving me advice when I started but I wonder if you have any ideas on what should anybody do on their first year as assistant professor? thanks for doing this!

Enrique

 

Sorry, crossing posts- I posted just posted thoughts on this... thanx  🙂

Quote from Magdalena Cerda on December 5, 2018, 10:47 am

Can you also please talk about how one can build collaborations? Thanks!

Good question!  Be well-versed in your niche area and carefully examine what sorts of expertise are needed to conduct research or perform applied/practice work. Are there role models/examples of successful collaboration inside/outside your group?  Learn from them.  Get to know your group/sub group well.  Go to seminars and presentations inside and outside your group.  Read papers/reports from those inside and outside your group. In an academic setting, centers and institutes are hubs to bring investigators together.  Learn about these centers and explore how to affiliate with relevant ones.

 

Andy,

Another important topic is professional development, Does SER have any planed activitivities?

Thanks

 

E

 

 

 

Quote from Rebecca Ehrenkranz on December 5, 2018, 10:40 am

Hi Dr. Olshan,

Thanks for doing this! To what extent do you predict that new tools for analyzing big data (like machine learning and natural language processing) will be incorporated into epi research? Should epidemiologists (or epidemiologists in training) dedicate time to learning how to apply these tools in their own research?

Rebecca,  sorry I missed your earlier post.  I do think "big data" will (has) become increasingly important.  The new tools hold much promise, but will also take some careful evaluation and assessment for their utility in epi and how they relate to current concepts of causality.  I do think it's worth trying to keep up with the methods and look for reviews and perspective papers on this by epidemiologists who will be trying to "translate" to our world.  Thnx

Quote from Enrique on December 5, 2018, 10:54 am

Andy,

Another important topic is professional development, Does SER have any planed activitivities?

Thanks

 

E

 

Thanks for the question.  SER has been engaged through it's SPC and ESI (early stage investigator)  group to provide specific a focus on professional development.  Please check out the SERLibrary, where you will find prof development via SERtalks, SERplaylists, and SER experts.  The 2019 meeting will also include related topics.  If you have any suggestions please let us know!

Andy

 

 

 

Thank you for participating in the SERforum Live discussion with Dr. Andy Olshan. Andy, thank you!

If you have additional questions, please feel free to post on the SERforum.

-Sue

Quote from Magdalena Cerda on December 5, 2018, 10:38 am

I have a question that applies to all stages of one's career. How would you advise people prepare for a job interview in academia? Does that differ if you're at the beginning, middle, or senior stages of an academic career, and if so, how?

It can vary by career stage, but there are some central aspects, I think. Do your homework!  Review the group’s website to better understand their demographics, mission, faculty/investigator’s areas of interest, the unit’s resources (labs, access to cores, studies, etc), any posted documents on expectations for promotion, mentoring programs, and other activities. This will prepare for the interview by allowing you to have more precise questions.  This will make a good impression and importantly help you judge if it would be a good fit if offered the job.

Think what you want to be doing in 3-5 years in terms of research, teaching, and service.  Again, it will help you shine when they ask what you want to be doing in the future and will help you assess the group and resources relative to your goals.  In some academic interviews you may be asked to go to the whiteboard and sketch out your first major grant/project. Being prepared for this, even if not asked, it is good preparation.  Andy

Thanks for this!

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