Daily Schedule – APP




Hone your soft skills and own the job market

Session Chair(s):   Timothy Lash,   Lauren McCullough
Date: 2019-06-18       Time: 8:30 am - 12:30 pm
Location:


     

“As a growing number of people with similar talents and education compete for the same jobs…soft skills become the differentiating factor separating one person from another” (Smith, 2011). Epidemiologists are well-trained in the knowledge and skills of the profession, yet have few opportunities to learn the soft skills that will most influence their career advancement. This workshop’s objectives are to introduce the importance of soft skills for career success, provide initial training in three soft skills, and suggest tools for self-study. The three soft skills will be: (a) introducing yourself (the “who am I” elevator pitch), (b) planning and time management, and (c) negotiation. For each, we will explain the importance of the skill for career advancement and conduct an exercise to initiate learning about the skill. The workshop will end with a description of additional soft skills, the reasons they are important, and resources for self-learning after the workshop concludes.

Session Chairs:
Timothy Lash, Emory University
Lauren McCullough, Emory University




Critical review and preparation of manuscripts reporting epidemiologic findings

Session Chair(s):   Moyses Szklo
Date: 2019-06-18       Time: 8:30 am - 12:30 pm
Location:


     

Overview abstract: In this half-day workshop, participants will critically review a paper as initially submitted to the American Journal of Epidemiology (AjE), but not yet published. The paper will be sent to participants in advance of the workshop for their critical review. During the workshop, a presentation will be made on some of the main points to be considered when preparing or reviewing a manuscript. Small group work will follow the presentation so that participants can compare their reviews and prepare a consolidated list of critical comments on the paper. Each group will designate a rapporteur, who will present the group’s review of the paper and decision letter to the whole group of participants. At the end of the workshop, students will receive copies of the manuscript’s AjE reviews, the initial editorial decision and the final version of the paper. Attendance will be limited to 30 participants.

Session Chairs:
Moyses Szklo, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health




Confounding control for estimating causal effects: Looking under the hood

Session Chair(s):   Nicolle Gatto,   Ulka Campbell
Date: 2019-06-18       Time: 8:30 am - 12:30 pm
Location:


     

This workshop introduces concepts of causal inference and confounding control for causal effect estimation. We will introduce potential outcomes, and articulate the conceptual basis and assumptions for two g-methods - standardization via g-computation and inverse probability weighting. Starting with a simple point-treatment setting we will explore how these methods estimate a causal effect, comparing them to more conventional techniques such as multivariable regression and propensity score control. We will then build to the more complex scenario of time-dependent confounding. Participants will learn how to apply these methods in SAS and R using an observational dataset with the primary goal of unpacking any “black boxes” to clarify the links among the causal effect of interest, the mechanics of these g-methods, and the programming code.

Session Chairs:
Nicolle Gatto, Pfizer Inc.
Ulka Campbell, Pfizer Inc.




Data manipulation, visualization, and reproducible documents with R and the Tidyverse

Session Chair(s):   Malcolm Barrett,   Corinne Riddell
Date: 2019-06-18       Time: 8:30 am - 12:30 pm
Location:


     

Recent developments by the R community have revolutionized the data analysis pipeline in R, from manipulating and visualizing data to communicating results. Our workshop will provide hands-on training in tools from the tidyverse ecosystem, using real epidemiologic data. In the first section, we will teach data manipulation with dplyr, a package that makes data cleaning easy, flexible, and enjoyable. In the next section, we will teach data visualization with ggplot2, the most popular plotting package in R, with a focus on creating publication-quality plots. We will then put these tools together to make reproducible documents. Using R Markdown, we will weave code and text together and learn to write papers and reports, exported to PDF, Word, or HTML, entirely in R. This workflow easily propagates upstream changes to data or analyses throughout a document and eliminates copy and paste errors. Together, these tools form a data analysis pipeline for reproducible, publication-ready work.

Session Chairs:
Malcolm Barrett, University of Southern California
Corinne Riddell, University of California, Berkeley




Implementing G Methods in Complex Longitudinal Data

Session Chair(s):   Ashley Naimi
Date: 2019-06-18       Time: 8:30 am - 12:30 pm
Location:


     

Applied health scientists are increasingly dealing with complex data structures to answer questions about exposure effects and mediation. In such settings, feedback between confounders, exposures, and mediators render standard adjustment methods (regression, restriction, stratification, matching) inappropriate. G methods, which consist of the parametric g formula, g estimation of structural nested models, and inverse probability weighted marginal structural models, can be used to quantify a variety of exposure effects with both simple and complex data structures. After a brief introduction to the potential outcomes framework, I will review obstacles to effect estimation with complex longitudinal data. All three g methods will then be introduced in a series of examples using actual data and software code (SAS, Stata, R). No prior knowledge of causal modeling, counterfactuals, or g methods is required.

Session Chairs:
Ashley Naimi, University of Pittsburgh




An Introduction to R for Epidemiologists

Session Chair(s):   Steve Mooney
Date: 2019-06-18       Time: 8:30 am - 12:30 pm
Location:


     

This workshop will introduce participants to the R statistical computing platform for use in epidemiologic analysis. It is not intended to transform untested novices into R wizards in a mere half-day; rather, the goal will be to introduce the conceptual underpinnings, tools, and external resources that participants will need to overcome barriers to using R that they might encounter on their own, later. The material is designed for epidemiologists who are already familiar performing analyses using other statistical software (e.g. SAS/Stata/SPSS) but who have no first-hand experience with the R language. More specifically, the course will cover 1) basic R syntax, 2) importing data, 3) constructing, cleaning, and manipulating data objects, 4) loading and using external packages, 5) simple statistical modeling, and 6) graphics. Participants must bring a laptop with R installed; the instructor will be available by email beforehand to assist with R installation if difficulties arise.

Session Chairs:
Steve Mooney, University of Washington




Communicating research findings to the media and public

Session Chair(s):   Jennifer Loukissas
Date: 2019-06-18       Time: 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Location:


     

Science advances when independent researchers publish their results. In addition to the written discourse maintained by the scientific journals, a parallel discussion often takes place in traditional (print, radio, television) and social media (Twitter, Reddit, etc.). Reporters are often interested in covering findings from epidemiological studies. To be effective in the important job of giving a good interview, scientists must prepare for interviews by writing 'key messages', participating in media training and mock interviews. This 4-hour workshop will review key principles of science communication as they relate to the particular challenges presented in epidemiological studies; participants will engage in several hands-on activities where they will practice skills to best communicate about their own research findings.

Session Chairs:
Jennifer Loukissas, National Institute of Health




Deep learning for epidemiologists: An introduction to neural networks

Session Chair(s):   Kathryn Rough
Date: 2019-06-18       Time: 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Location:


     

Deep learning methods are increasingly being applied to problems in the health and medical domains; this workshop is designed to offer an accessible introduction to the basics of deep learning for epidemiologists. There will be a review of fundamental machine learning concepts, including model capacity, underfitting, overfitting, regularization, and performance metrics. This will be followed by an overview of several commonly-used deep learning model architectures, including Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) for images and Recurrent Neural Networks (RNNs) for sequences. Finally, we will discuss the evaluation of deep learning models, including critical challenges such as interpretability, transportability, fairness, and implementation. Participants will leave the workshop with the ability to engage with and critically evaluate medical research using deep learning methods.

Session Chairs:
Kathryn Rough, Google




Introduction to causal inference for multiple time point exposures

Session Chair(s):   Laura Balzer,   Maya Petersen
Date: 2019-06-18       Time: 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Location:


     

This workshop applies the "causal roadmap" to longitudinal data structures, including survival-type outcomes subject to right-censoring, and to the joint causal effects of multiple interventions, including cumulative effects of treatments over time and controlled direct effects. We will cover longitudinal causal models, identification in the presence of time-dependent confounding; and estimation of joint treatment effects using G-computation, inverse probability weighting, and targeted maximum likelihood estimators (TMLE). During the workshop session, participants will work through the roadmap using an applied example and implement these estimators with the ltmle R package.

Session Chairs:
Laura Balzer, University of Massachusetts-Amherst
Maya Petersen, University of California, Berkeley




Mendelian randomization: a practical guide

Session Chair(s):   Neil Davies
Date: 2019-06-18       Time: 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Location:


     

Mendelian randomization (MR) is a method that uses genetic variants as instrumental variables to test the causal effect of a (non-genetic) risk factor on a disease or health-related outcome. This course provides an introduction to the conduct, assumptions, strengths and limitations of MR, including the latest sensitivity analyses. It uses a mixture of lectures and practicals in R and Stata. This is a beginner to intermediate level course. Students will learn about one-sample and two-sample MR, including their assumptions and get practical experience of applying these methods to real data. They will also learn about a range of sensitivity analyses that explore likely violation of the assumptions of MR. Prior experience of using MR is not required, but participants should have an understanding of aetiological epidemiological principles and ideally be working on causal population health questions. Provisional Tutors : Debbie Lawlor , Neil Davies , Rebecca Richmond , Kaitlin Wade , Carolina Borge

Session Chairs:
Neil Davies, University of Bristol




E-values, Unmeasured Confounding, Measurement Error, and Selection Bias

Session Chair(s):   Tyler VanderWeele,   Louisa Smith
Date: 2019-06-18       Time: 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Location:


     

The workshop will consider sensitivity analysis for different forms of bias in epidemiology. It will begin with confounding, focusing on a new metric to evaluate sensitivity to unmeasured confounding called the E-value. The E-value is the minimum strength of association, on the risk ratio scale, that an unmeasured confounder would need to have with both the exposure and the outcome, conditional on the measured covariates, to fully explain away the exposure-outcome association. E-value calculations for risk ratios, outcomes differences, odds ratios, and hazard ratios will be discussed. The E-value can be calculated in a straightforward way from study results and its use could help unify assessment of unmeasured confounding. The workshop will proceed by describing very recent analogous easy-to-implement approaches to also address differential measurement error and selection bias. The methods, taken as a whole, will constitute a straightforward comprehensive approach to bias analysis.

Session Chairs:
Tyler VanderWeele, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Louisa Smith, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health




Using Monte Carlo Simulations for Quantitative Bias Analysis

Session Chair(s):   Hailey Banack,   Elizabeth Rose Mayeda
Date: 2019-06-18       Time: 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Location:


     

This workshop will provide a comprehensive overview of using Monte Carlo simulations as a tool for quantitative bias analysis. The content covered in the workshop is intended to strengthen participants’ understanding of the theoretical concepts of bias and technical details of running Monte Carlo simulations. To accomplish this objective we will work through three examples of bias analysis using Monte Carlo simulations: (1) an example of using Monte Carlo simulation procedures for record-level correction for exposure misclassification bias, (2) an simple example of Monte Carlo simulations for unmeasured confounding, and (3) a more complex example of Monte Carlo simulations for quantifying collider stratification bias. At the end of the workshop, participants should walk away with a greater understanding of the 'why' and 'how' of quantitative bias analysis (i.e., why bias analysis is important and how to use Monte Carlo simulation techniques to implement the bias analysis).

Session Chairs:
Hailey Banack, McGill University
Elizabeth Rose Mayeda, University of California, Los Angeles




An introduction to directed acyclic graphs: What you never wanted but needed to know about bias and didn’t even know to ask.

Session Chair(s):   Ian Shrier
Date: 2019-06-18       Time: 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Location:


     

This workshop will introduce participants to directed acyclic graphs (DAGs). We will review the basic principles and show how they can be used to determine appropriate sets of variables for estimating total causal effects of exposure (treatment). Participants will work through concrete examples of increasing complexity. We will also introduce how DAGs can be used in more advanced applications, including natural and controlled direct and indirect effects and study design.

Session Chairs:
Ian Shrier, McGill University




An introduction to predicting exposures and outcomes using omic biomarkers

Session Chair(s):   Paul Yousefi,   Matthew Suderman
Date: 2019-06-18       Time: 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Location:


     

Deeply phenotyping participants over several classes of omic markers, including genetic, epigenetic, and metabolomic, is increasingly feasible for epidemiological studies and provides opportunities to develop biomarkers with improved prediction of exposure and ill health. Optimizing the utility of these high dimensional, integrated data sources requires a toolkit of statistical approaches distinct from those typically used in epidemiology to assess correlation and causation. We provide a primer on the essential considerations (e.g. bias, variance, calibration) and evaluation procedures (e.g. performance metrics, cross-validation) required when developing such predictors. We offer context on how such problems have been approached to date (e.g. polygenic risk scores, epigenetic clocks), as well as common pitfalls. Lastly, we introduce how several machine learning techniques can be harnessed to design generalizable and interpretable predictions of complex biological phenomena.

Session Chairs:
Paul Yousefi, University of Bristol
Matthew Suderman, University of Bristol




Bayesian Multilevel/Longitudinal Modeling

Session Chair(s):   Chuck Huber
Date: 2019-06-18       Time: 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Location:


     

Bayesian statistical methods are increasing in popularity in epidemiology. This talk will briefly review the concepts of multilevel/longitudinal models, introduce the concepts and jargon of Bayesian statistics, and then demonstrate how to fit Bayesian multilevel/longitudinal models using Stata's -bayes- prefix. We will focus on practical issues such as selection of priors for random effects, how to fit models with cross-classified random effects, and Bayesian model selection.

Session Chairs:
Chuck Huber, StataCorp




How to make a picture worth a thousand words: Effectively communicating your research results using statistical graphics

Session Chair(s):   Michael Jackson
Date: 2019-06-18       Time: 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Location:


     

Epidemiologists can use statistical graphics to understand our data and to guide us toward correct inferences. Well-designed graphics can also be powerful tools for communicating our study findings. However, while statistical software makes it easy to produce certain types of figures, the default options leave much to be desired. Too often, the result is figures that distract, confuse, or even distort data. In this workshop, participants will first learn the fundamentals of effective data visualization. This includes selecting appropriate chart types, drawing attention to the relevant data, using effective visual cues, and providing helpful context. We will discuss how to put these principles into practice, leading viewers to make comparisons, identify trends, and find meaningful correlations. Finally, we will walk through techniques for going beyond the default settings of various software packages to produce well-designed figures.

Session Chairs:
Michael Jackson, Kaiser Permanente




Infographics 101 for public health

Session Chair(s):   Sujani Sivanantharajah
Date: 2019-06-18       Time: 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Location:


     

"Infographics 101 for public health" provides public health professionals the confidence to design infographics. This workshop is a condensed 2-hour hands-on experience of the full online course available on PHSPOT.ca. The modules of the workshop include: a crash course on design (elements of design, core design principles); infographics 101 (elements of an infographic, layouts, public health examples), and the designing process (a 9 step process). Participants will have the opportunity to apply the concepts and recreate an infographic using PowerPoint (a widely available software on all computers) during the workshop, and be introduced to a suite of tools and resources. The workshop is designed for public health professionals interested in using infographics as a knowledge translation product but are not confident in design.

Session Chairs:
Sujani Sivanantharajah, PH Spot




A primer on electronic health record research design and analysis

Session Chair(s):   Neal Goldstein
Date: 2019-06-18       Time: 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Location:


     

Increasingly data mined from the electronic health record (EHR) are being used in epidemiological research. But more data does not equate to better quality research. In this workshop, we will cover the basics of working with EHRs and designing valid epidemiological analyses with these data. Specifically, we will broadly cover the following topics through didactic lecture and interactive group exercises: 1. Architecture of the electronic health record 2. Understanding the clinical population and how this relates to a target/general population 3. Designing epidemiological studies using EHR data 4. Obtaining data from the EHR, including data export, linkage, and variable manipulation (e.g. parsing data from free text) 5. Appropriate analytic designs from these data, including case-control, retrospective cohort, and longitudinal study design 6. Common pitfalls in working with EHR data and resources for additional reference.

Session Chairs:
Neal Goldstein, Drexel University




Speed Mentor Networking

Session Chair(s):  
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 7:00 am - 7:45 am
Location:


     

TICKETED EVENT – REGISTRATION REQUIRED Students and post-docs will have the opportunity to meet and network with senior and mid-career epidemiologists in small groups. Following a “speed dating” format, each mentor will be paired with 2-3 student/post-doc attendees at a time, and students will rotate around the room during the session. This will be an opportunity to network with potential mentors and discuss career and professional development experiences and opportunities. This event will be capped at 30 attendees.

Session Chairs:
,


Discussants:
Jaimie Gradus, Boston University
Lauren McCullough, Emory University
Erin Bowles, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute
Britton Trabert, National Cancer Institute
Tess Gilbert, Oregon Health and Scientific University
Brandon Marshall, Brown University
Magdalena Cerda, University of California, Davis
Anne Marie Jukic, Yale University
Shawnita Sealy-Jefferson, The Ohio State University


Plenary 1 (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   Andrew Olshan
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 8:00 am - 9:30 am
Location: Nicollet ABC


     



Session Chairs:
Andrew Olshan, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


Presenters:
Enrique Schisterman, SER President
"Presidential Address"
Alix Spiegel, Co-Host, Invisibilia



Good epi, bad epi: Is short birth spacing really that bad?

Session Chair(s):   Gavin Pereira,   Katherine Ahrens
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Location: Lakeshore A


     

For both high and lower income countries the WHO and most obstetric societies recommend waiting at least 18 months to 2 years after giving birth before trying for another child. The harms of long and short intervals have been debated after the recent publication of several matched studies that cast doubt on the extent of these effects. This symposium will bring together researchers with opposing views on the evidence to date and the design of such studies. Birth spacing is an intuitively simple topic but requires application of many epidemiological concepts. The research is leading to new WHO recommendations and national guidelines. An innovative yet simple sibling matched study will be used to demonstrate systemic bias in previous studies (BMJ 2014). We will present conflicting results after stillbirth implying that adherence to current WHO guidelines could cause harm (Lancet 2018). The symposium will close on effects in low income countries, where further research is needed most.

Session Chairs:
Gavin Pereira, Curtin University, Austrailia
Katherine Ahrens, University of Southern Maine


Presenters:
Mark Klebanoff, The Ohio State University
"Why do we think there’s a causal effect?"
Gavin Pereira, Curtin University, Australia
"Is it all due to confounding and selection bias?"
Katherine Ahrens, University of Southern Maine
"Response – No it’s not!"
Annette Regan, Texas A&M
"It is all due to effect modification."
Amanuel Gebremedhin, Curtin University Australia/Jimma University Ethiopia
"Response – Effect modification might exist but we have forgotten about low income countries, where it matters the most"


Spotlight on the controls: interesting real-world challenges faced with control groups and the implications for randomized controlled trials. (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   Jennifer Ahern,   Maya Petersen
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Location: Nicollet A


     

The randomized controlled trial is considered to provide the highest level of evidence for causal effects. The focus is typically on the treatment arm, and less attention has been paid to the control group. As the comparator to the intervention, this group has as much impact on the results and interpretation of the trial as the treatment. Recent randomized controlled trials have encountered issues that include changes in local policy and standards of care, spillover, and major unexpected disruptions during the course of the trial. Bringing issues encountered with controls into the spotlight can provide insights for how to proceed in the face of real-world challenges and opportunities for trials. This discussion will include practical and ethical challenges faced, how trade-offs were balanced, what was learned along the way, and what the implications are for trial results. Recent experiences with control groups from individual, family and community randomized trials will be discussed.

Session Chairs:
Jennifer Ahern, University of California, Berkeley
Maya Petersen, University of California, Berkeley


Presenters:
Maya Petersen,
"Cluster randomized trial design and interpretation in a rapidly evolving policy and implementation context: Insights from the Sustainable East Africa Research on Community Health (SEARCH) Trial"
Jade Benjamin-Chung,
"Measuring spillover effects in the treatment and control arms in cluster-randomized trials"
Mi-Suk Kang-Dufour,
"Adapting a community randomized trial design in response to a regional outbreak event: A case study of malaria elimination in Namibia"
Theresa Osypuk,
"What happened to the controls in the Moving To Opportunity housing experiment?"
Brandon Marshall,
"Usual and unusual care: Selecting control groups in behavioral interventions"
Discussants:
Enrique Schisterman,


Diversity & Inclusion: Epidemiology and community stakeholders: Impressions and Experiences (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   Martha Werler,   Elisa Jean-Baptiste
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Location: Nicollet D3


     

Toward the reduction of health disparities, epidemiologic research questions are influenced by many factors. One such set of factors is the experiences, impressions, and priorities of community members who would most likely be affected by research results. As epidemiologists, we too often by-pass stakeholders’ views when forming research questions. In this symposium, a panel would comprise 4-5 speakers, each of whom would share their stories about community member inclusion and exclusion. Panel members would include community stakeholders and community participatory epidemiology researchers. A moderator would then lead discussion, with questions and comments from the audience and responses and comments from panel members. This symposium seeks to open conversations on how diversity and inclusion issues can be considered as we frame research agendas and research questions.

Session Chairs:
Martha Werler, BUSPH Epidemiology
Elisa Jean-Baptiste, Student University of Montreal


Presenters:
Ruby Nguyen, University of Minnesota
"Is It Time to Develop an Epidemiologic Triad Model to Support the Theory of Community-Engaged Scholarship?"
Mary Roary, NIH
"Who Is Responsible For Eliminating Health Disparities? What Are You Doing About It?"
Shawnita Sealy-Jefferson, Ohio State
"Listen To and Trust Black Women"
Joseph Yracheta, Missouri Breaks Industries Research, Inc.
"Intersections of Race, Culture, & Sovereignty Hurt American Indian Epidemiology"
Discussants:
Yvette Cozier, Boston University


The Promise and Peril of Randomness

Session Chair(s):   Eric Lofgren
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Location: Nicollet D1


     

Check out the Mini SERplaylist for this session: https://epiresearch.org/serlibrary/serplaylists/ Randomness – and random error – are inescapable elements of the design, analysis and interpretation of epidemiologic studies, but the exact nature of the impact of randomness and its effects on our inference are often elided, or assumed to be captured in relatively simplistic representations of uncertainty. This symposium will delve deeper into the role randomness plays in epidemiology, exploring both threats to the validity of our studies as well as ways to exploit randomness to improve and validate our methods.

Session Chairs:
Eric Lofgren, Washington State University


Presenters:
Jeanette Stingone,
"Do these results seem random to you? A validation approach for investigating multiple exposures using tree-based methods"
Laura Balzer,
"Biologically or socially transmitted outcomes? Be (un)certain of your uncertainty!"
Daniel Westreich,
"Causal identification and randomness: why 'chance confounding' is a contradiction in terms"
Eric Lofgren,
"Bad Doctors or Bad Luck?: Stochastic threats to common quality of care metrics"
Jon Zelner,
"Accounting for selection bias in the measurement of outbreak intervention efficacy"


The elephant in the room: causal inference in the face of competing events

Session Chair(s):   Jessie K Edwards,   Jessica G Young
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Location: Nicollet BC


     

Check out the Mini SERplaylist for this session: https://epiresearch.org/serlibrary/serplaylists/ Competing events preclude occurrence of the event of interest. Epidemiologists must frequently make choices about how to handle competing events in estimating the effect of a treatment or exposure on the event of interest. Debate has surrounded various analytic options in this setting and confusion pervades as to the causal interpretation of resulting estimates along with the underlying assumptions needed to justify a given interpretation. The goal of this symposium is to help demystify choices surrounding these analytic options. Speakers will elucidate choices of causal parameters that may be defined in a competing events setting, the assumptions needed to estimate them in real-world data and how these jointly lead to an analytic approach. Applied examples will be given illustrating how these choices ultimately have implications in practice. The session will close with an interactive discussion of the merits and drawbacks of each approach.

Session Chairs:
Jessie K Edwards, UNC Chapel Hill
Jessica G Young, Harvard Medical School


Presenters:
Jessica Young,
"Making sense of analytic choices in competing events data using counterfactual casual models"
Jess Edwards,
"Choices about competing events, illustrated"
Mats Stensrud,
"Separable effects: new estimands for causal inference in competing risk settings"
Discussants:
Miguel Hernan,
Stephen Cole,


Remove the hesitation from your validation

Session Chair(s):   Lisa Bodnar,   Matthew Fox
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Location: Nicollet D2


     

Check out the Mini SERplaylist for this session: https://epiresearch.org/serlibrary/serplaylists/ With the development of bias analysis methods, more emphasis has been placed on collecting validation data yet few epidemiologists receive training in conducting validation studies. This lack of training is concerning as poor validation study methodology can lead to more biased adjusted estimates than conventional estimates. Validation studies can suffer from many of the same biases as etiologic studies, including measurement error and selection bias. Further, it is not well known which parameters can be estimated from a validation study are determined by the sampling approach. Before the session, we will survey a sample of SER members on their understanding of validation study design. We will use these responses to guide the content of our symposium. We seek to illustrate concepts of validation study design and implementation of bias analysis in the context of 3 research questions. We will discuss implications of validation design choices, including potential for biased findings.

Session Chairs:
Lisa Bodnar, University of Pittsburgh
Matthew Fox, Boston University


Presenters:
Matthew Fox,
"What do SER members know about validation studies? Results of an informal survey"
Hailey Banack,
"Battle of the bias parameters: comparing methods for validating BMI in postmenopausal women"
Timothy Lash,
"The specific importance of specificity"
Penny Howards,
"Cancer treatment and pregnancy outcomes: challenges in validation and bias analyses"


Use of simulation in non-infectious disease epidemiology

Session Chair(s):   Melinda Power
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Location: Lakeshore B


     

Simulation studies long been used in other contexts, but use in non-infectious disease epidemiology is limited. This symposium highlights situations where simulation may be useful, illustrates how simulation can address pressing questions that may be unanswerable with traditional methods or available data, and discusses best practices and helpful approaches to implementation. Dr. Mayeda will discuss use of simulation to quantify bias due to selective survival in lifecourse epidemiology, with application to the question of sex differences in Alzheimer’s disease incidence. Dr. Power will discuss use of simulation to bridge the gap between observational studies and RCT design, with application to the example of diabetes management and dementia risk. Dr. Cerdá will discuss use of agent-based modeling to answer policy-relevant questions we can’t answer with real data, with a focus on firearm violence. Finally, Drs. Burke and Levine will discuss novel strategies to ease use of simulation.

Session Chairs:
Melinda Power, George Washington University


Presenters:
Teresa Filshtein,
"Use of a simulation framework to combine data from multiple observational data sources"
Elizabeth Rose Mayeda,
"Simulations for quantifying selection bias in lifecourse epidemiology"
Magdalena Cerda,
"Simulating the bounds of plausibility: using agent-based models to estimate the impact of high-risk versus population-based approaches to prevent firearm violence"
Luciana Copeland and James Burke,
"Strategies to Optimize Simulation Fidelity and Code Readability — Perspectives, Pair Programming, and Open Source"


The Art and Science of Peer Review (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   Hailey Banack
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: Nicollet D3


     

Journal editors rely on peer reviews to critically assess the suitability of submitted manuscripts for publication. However, writing a good peer review is a skill that is not often formally taught in epidemiology programs. Although the content of any peer review is based on science, there is an art to writing a good peer review. This lunch-time panel discussion will feature journal editors and researchers with peer review expertise. The aim of the session is to discuss the components of a good peer review (i.e., what to include, what not to include), how to get involved in the peer review process, the value of doing peer reviews, and other relevant topics.

Session Chairs:
Hailey Banack, University at Buffalo


Presenters:
Bill Miller,

Sunni Mumford, National Institute of Enviornmental Health Sciences

Jay Kaufman, McGill University

Justin Lessler, JHSPH



DAG Hack-a-thon: Crowdsourcing DAG development with an example from reproductive epidemiology

Session Chair(s):   Matthew Fox,   Ellie Murray
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: Nicollet BC


     

Since publication of the groundbreaking 2001 paper by Greenland, Robins and Pearl, Directed Acyclic Graphs (DAGs) have grown in popularity within epidemiology. They have been instrumental in distinguishing between types of biases and in deciding whether or not to adjust for variables in particular analyses. It is often said that DAGs improve science by making assumptions explicit. In theory, this allows the research community to debate the merits of the proposed DAG, improving confidence in research results when the DAG is agreed upon, or leading to improved analyses when disagreements persist. However, in practice, there is little large-scale debate on the structure of DAGs within epidemiologic subfields. This may be because there is currently very little guidance on how to develop DAGs in a way that is open and transparent, and that gathers together expert opinion to aid a larger research community. As a field, we need methods for generating DAGs that distill the generally held understanding of the research community and key stakeholders. Ultimately, such DAGs could even be combined into an editable repository that can adapt as knowledge improves and which is readily available to all for comment. Towards that end, we will conduct an hour long, lunchtime working (hack-a-thon) session in which we use those in the room to develop a DAG around questions about birth spacing. While we will use this topic to demonstrate the approach, the intent is to demonstrate a way to develop DAGs that is transparent and acknowledges areas where the scientific community disagrees to help in agenda setting. The session leaders will begin the session with some proposed examples to describe the problem. We will invite audience members to contribute their knowledge to critiquing the DAG, contributing new variables and arrows deemed important and to do real-time searching in the literature to identify literature that supports or refutes arrows proposed for the DAG. Audience members do not need to be familiar with birth spacing research to participate in the session. However, we encourage those interested in learning more to attend the session “Good epi, bad epi: Is short birth spacing really that bad?”

Session Chairs:
Matthew Fox, Boston University
Ellie Murray, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health




Early Stage Investigators - Hone your soft skills and own the job market (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   Timothy Lash,   Lauren McCullough
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: Nicollet A


     

“As a growing number of people with similar talents and education compete for the same jobs…soft skills become the differentiating factor separating one person from another” (Smith, 2011). Epidemiologists are well-trained in the knowledge and skills of the profession, yet have few opportunities to learn the soft skills that will most influence their career advancement. This workshop’s objectives are to introduce the importance of soft skills for career success, provide initial training in three soft skills, and suggest tools for self-study. The three soft skills will be: (a) introducing yourself (the “who am I” elevator pitch), (b) planning and time management, and (c) negotiation. For each, we will explain the importance of the skill for career advancement and conduct an exercise to initiate learning about the skill. The workshop will end with a description of additional soft skills, the reasons they are important, and resources for self-learning after the workshop concludes.

Session Chairs:
Timothy Lash, Emory University
Lauren McCullough, Emory University




Student and Faculty Recruitment Fair

Session Chair(s):  
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: Skyway AB


     

In an attempt to give students and job applicants a structured opportunity to interact with doctoral programs and potential employers, SER has set aside an hour for Doctoral Programs and Potential Employers to meet with Prospective Students to learn more about the programs and Job Applicants to meet with those who are recruiting in a dedicated room.

Session Chairs:
,




Cardiovascular Disease

Session Chair(s):   Pam Lutsey
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Location: Nicollet D1


     



Session Chairs:
Pam Lutsey, University of Minnesota


Presenters:
Molly Skerker, NYC Fire Department
"The World Trade Center Disaster and Long-Term CVD Risk Among Firefighters"
Sonia M. Grandi, McGill University
"The importance of non-traditional risk factors for prediction of cardiovascular disease in women of reproductive age"
Sina Noshad, Brown University
"Effect of longitudinally measured physical activity on the 10-year risk of heart failure among postmenopausal women: A Women’s Health Initiative study"
Larisa G. Tereshchenko, Oregon Health and Science University
"Prevention of heart failure in hypertension – disentangling the role of evolving left ventricular hypertrophy and blood pressure lowering: the ALLHAT study"
Shan Luo, University of Hong Kong
"The impact of genetically predicted Hgb on ischemic heart disease myocardial infarction heart failure and venous thromboembolism using the UK Biobank"
Olivia Moir, Queens University
"The apparent protective effect of surgery versus medical treatment on mortality in patients with infective endocarditis: Possible selection bias and time-dependent confounding in cohort studies"


Injury/Violence 2

Session Chair(s):   Steve Marshall
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Location: Nicollet D2


     



Session Chairs:
Steve Marshall, University of North Carolina


Presenters:
Sidra Goldman-Mellor, UC Merced
"Incidence of maternal deaths due to overdose and suicide in California 2010-2012"
Katherine Muldoon, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
"A 15-year population-based investigation of sexual assault cases in Ontario, Canada"
Sarah Palumbo, FAU Student Health Services
"Geographic Variations in Temporal Trends in Mortality from Prescription Opioids"
Mathew V. Kiang, Stanford University
"Decomposition of the US black-white inequality in life expectancy: Quantifying the impact of the opioid epidemic"
Sandhya Kageepeta, NYC City Hall
"News Coverage of Intimate Partner Homicides in New York City (2013-16): A Systematic Review"
Guohua Li, Columbia University
"Is marijuana use associated with decreased use of prescription opioids? Findings from toxicological testing results for fatally injured drivers"


Methods that acknowledge, address, and even embrace data complexity (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   Maya Petersen,   Kara Rudolph
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Location: Nicollet A


     



Session Chairs:
Maya Petersen, University of California, Berkeley
Kara Rudolph, University of California, Berkeley


Presenters:
Alexander P. Keil, University of North Carolina
"A quantile-based g-computation approach to addressing the effects of exposure mixtures"
Catherine Lesko, Johns Hopkins University
"Censoring for loss to follow-up in time-to-event analyses of composite outcomes or in the presence of competing risks"
Ashley Buchanan, University of Rhode Island
"Disseminated Effects in Agent Based Models: A Potential Outcomes Framework to Inform Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Coverage Levels for HIV Prevention"
Audrey Murchland, University of California, San Francisco
"Improving Instrumental Variable Studies of Social Determinants of Health: Evaluating the Bias-Variance Tradeoff When Adjusting for Potential Instrument-Outcome Confounders"
Eleanor Murray, Harvard University
"Guidelines for causal inference from pragmatic randomized trials require analytic methods from observational studies"
Ashley Naimi, University of Pittsburgh
"Valid Causal Effect Estimates with Machine Learning Algorithms"


Novel Methods in Perinatal Epidemiology

Session Chair(s):   Anna Pollack
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Location: Nicollet BC


     



Session Chairs:
Anna Pollack, George Mason University


Presenters:
Liv Grimstvedt Kvalvik, Online.no
"Five Complications of Term Pregnancies that Predict Future Preterm Delivery"
Sydney K. Willis, Boston University
"Interval between live birth and initiation of current pregnancy attempt and fecundability"
Michelle Dimitris, McGill University
"How is gestational weight gain between clinical visits best estimated in twin and singleton pregnancies?"
Dana Goin, University of California, Berkeley
"Firearm violence and preterm birth: Evidence of stochastic mediation by pregnancy complications and health behaviors"
Harpreet Chahal, University of Toronto
"Outbursts of Anger Immediately Prior to Placental Abruption: A Case-Crossover Study"
Alison Gemmill,
"Increase in preterm births among US Latina women after the 2016 presidential election"


Social epidemiology: research at the intersection of social structure and public policy (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   Lynne Messer,   Mahasin Mujahid
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Location: Nicollet D3


     



Session Chairs:
Lynne Messer, Portland State University
Mahasin Mujahid, University of California, Berkeley


Presenters:
Elleni Hailu, University of California, Berkeley
"Understanding the Role of Social Support in the Relationship between Perceived Discrimination and Telomere Length: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)"
Lara Cushing, San Francisco State University
"Acute care utilization among children experiencing eviction in San Francisco California"
Lindsay Fernandez-Rhodes, Portland State University
"The Effect of the 287(g) Immigration Program on Pediatric Hospitalizations for Ambulatory Sensitive Conditions in North Carolina"
Jonathon Platt, Columbia University
"Do pro-family employee benefits mitigate the burden of competing workplace and domestic roles on women's depressive symptoms?"
Rita Hamad, University of California, San Francisco
"The Effects of Paid Family Leave on Child and Parent Mental Health: A Quasi-experimental Study of U.S. State Policies"
Jerzy Eisenberg-Guyot, University of Washington
"Does declining state-level labor union density explain changing state-level racial and educational mortality inequities?"


Cancer

Session Chair(s):   Eric Polley
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Location: Lakeshore A


     



Session Chairs:
Eric Polley, Mayo Clinic


Presenters:
Rebecca Richmond, University of Bristol
"Using Mendelian Randomization To Understand How Chronotype Influences Breast Cancer Risk"
Jacob K. Kresovich, NIH
"Circulating immune cell composition and breast cancer risk"
Vikki Ho, University of Montreal
"Evaluation of the association between UGT2B17 gene deletion and adverse symptomatology in postmenopausal women treated with exemestane on the CCTG MAP.3 trial"
Anne-Michelle Noone, NIH
"Cancer-Attributable Mortality among Solid Organ Transplant Recipients in the United States 1987-2014"
Albee Ling, Stanford University
"A Semi-Supervised Machine Learning Approach to Detecting Recurrent Metastatic Breast Cancer Cases Using Linked Cancer Registry and Electronic Medical Record Data"
Barbra A. Dickerman, Harvard University
"Causal model-based reinforcement learning for physical activity interventions among prostate cancer survivors"


Policy evaluations in global health research

Session Chair(s):   Robin Richardson
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Location: Lakeshore B


     



Session Chairs:
Robin Richardson, McGill University


Presenters:
Hongtian Li, Peking University Health
"Association of China's Universal 2-child policy with changes in births and birth-related health factors"
Christine L. Gray, Duke University
"Does moving orphans out of institutional care improve their wellbeing? Using marginal structural models to estimate policy-relevant effects"
Ariadne Rivera-Aguirre, NYU Langone Health
"Exploiting minimum legal marijuana use age to assess the impact of marijuana legalization in Uruguay on marijuana use patterns"
Yan Chai, University of California, Los Angeles
"Understanding the impact of paid maternity leave policy on childhood diarrhea through mediation analysis: evidence from 40 low-and-middle-income countries"
Maria Jose Monsalves, Universidad San Sebastian
"Impact evaluation of Explicit Health Guarantees policy in Breast gallbladder stomach and colorectal cancer mortality"
Arijit Nandi, McGill University
"Evaluating the impact of the Maternal Health Voucher Scheme in rural Bangladesh: a quasi-experimental interrupted time-series analysis"


Tracking the burden of substance abuse (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   Magdalena Cerda
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Location: Nicollet A


     



Session Chairs:
Magdalena Cerda, NYU Langone Health


Presenters:
Sidra Goldman-Mellor, UC Merced
"Risk of suicide after emergency department visit for opioid overdose"
Christopher L. Rowe, University of California, Berkeley
"Fentanyl overdose deaths in the United States 2013-2017: A national county-level assessment of geographic patterns correlates and the relationship with heroin overdose deaths"
Lauren Tanz, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services
"Surveillance of Emergency Medical Services Response with Naloxone Administrations - North Carolina, April - September 2017"
Yu Li (Seashore), Brown University
"Predicting drug overdose deaths in Rhode Island: A comparison of machine learning methods and variable selection procedures"
Yingxi Chen, NIH
"Premature mortality from drug overdoses: a comparative analysis of 13 OECD countries with high quality death certificate data 2001-2015"
Julia P. Schleimer, UC Davis
"Alcohol- and drug-related offenses and risk for future firearm suicide among authorized purchasers of handguns in California"


Novel Methods and Questions in Understanding and Quantifying Health Disparities (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   Nadia Abuelezam
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Location: Nicollet D3


     



Session Chairs:
Nadia Abuelezam, Boston College


Presenters:
Anusha Vable, University of California, San Francisco
"Does the type and timing of educational attainment influence health? A novel application of sequence analysis"
Adina Zeki Al Hazzouri, Columbia University
"Causal methods for evaluating the health effects of migration history"
Jacqueline M. Torres, University of California, San Francisco
"Longitudinal Associations Between Worry about Deportation and Blood Pressure, Body Mass Index, and Waist Circumference Among Adult Women: A Community-Based Cohort Study"
Ganga Bey, University of Massachusetts
"Setting matters in the relationships of reported interpersonal discrimination with cardiovascular health: findings from CARDIA"
Cristian Carmeli, Lausanne University Hospital
"Disentagling life-course socio-economic determinants of adult inflammation: a multi-cohort study using a counterfactual mediation framework"


Maps, models, and methods: Approaches in infectious disease epidemiology

Session Chair(s):   Kumi Smith
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Location: Lakeshore A


     



Session Chairs:
Kumi Smith, University of Minnesota


Presenters:
Elizabeth McQuade, The University of Virginia
"Estimates of protection from natural immunity against enteric infections and diarrhea in a longitudinal birth cohort"
Julianne Meisner,
"Finding the scientific question in the exposure haystack: re-analysis of a matched case-control study of animal-related risk factors for pediatric diarrhea in Kenya"
Jeremy Grey, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
"Compared to whom? Reference population matters when calculating relative measures of STI and HIV rates by sexual risk category"
Rohit P. Ojha, JPS Health Network
"Sustained virologic response as a surrogate marker for hepatocellular carcinoma after treatment of hepatitis C virus infection"
Mabel Carabali, McGill University
"Spatiotemporal distribution of dengue, chikungunya and zika cases across different ethnic groups in Brazil and Colombia"
Matthew S. Mietchen, Washington State University
"Population Structure Drives Differential Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Colonization Dynamics"


Late Breaker 1

Session Chair(s):   Matthew Fox,   Shawnita Sealy-Jefferson
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Location: Lakeshore B


     



Session Chairs:
Matthew Fox, Boston University
Shawnita Sealy-Jefferson, The Ohio State University




Diabetes: Risk factors and ramifications

Session Chair(s):   Stefanie Hinkle
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Location: Nicollet D2


     



Session Chairs:
Stefanie Hinkle, National Institute of Health


Presenters:
Aryn Phillips, University of California, Berkeley
"Unhealthier Food Environments Associated with Higher Hospitalization Rates among Adults with Diabetes but Not in Most Extreme Food Swamps"
Jyostsna S. Jagai, University of Illinois at Chicago
"The association between environmental quality and diabetes control in the U.S."
Luis A. Rodriguez, University of California, San Francisco
"Does liver fat mediate the estimated effect of BMI on type 2 diabetes risk? Evidence from The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis"
Peter WG Tennant, University of Leeds
"Fasting plasma glucose diagnosis of gestational diabetes and the risk of late stillbirth: a mediation analysis in a case-control study from England UK"
Mengying Li, NIH
"Gestational Diabetes and Longitudinal Ultrasonographic Measures of Fetal Growth in the NICHD Fetal Growth Studies-Singletons"
Yvette C. Cozier, Boston University
"Gestational Diabetes in Relation to Urinary Incontinence in US Black Women"


Perspectives in Pharmacoepidemiology: Comparing data, designs, and analytic goals

Session Chair(s):   John Jackson
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Location: Nicollet D1


     



Session Chairs:
John Jackson, John Hopkins University


Presenters:
Angelo Karaboyas, University of Michigan
"Replicating randomized trial results with observational data using the parametric g-formula: An application to intravenous iron treatment in hemodialysis patients"
Barbra A. Dickerman, Harvard University
"Statins and risk of seven cancers: a population-based cohort study using electronic health records of 722 213 UK adults"
Julie Rouette, McGill University
"Incretin-Based Drugs and the Risk of Lung Cancer in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes"
Kristin Palmsten, HealthPartners
"Oral Corticosteroid Use During Pregnancy and Risk of Preterm Birth"
Meng Wang, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry
"Estimating the effect of implantable cardioverter defibrillators on mortality in patients with long QT syndrome using marginal structural models"


Perinatal and Pediatric Epidemiology

Session Chair(s):   Nigel Paneth
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Location: Nicollet BC


     



Session Chairs:
Nigel Paneth, Michigan State University


Presenters:
Kelly Ferguson, NIH
"Associations between oxidative stress and risk for preterm birth in Puerto Rico"
Sifang Kathy Zhao, Vanderbilt University
"The Association Between Vigorous Physical Activity and Time to Pregnancy"
Paige D. Wartko, Kaiser Permanante
"Validity of maternal weight and gestational weight gain measures from birth certificates"
Erika Fuchs, The University of Texas
"Predictors of up-to-date vaccination in the National Immunization Survey-Child"
Mark Klebanoff, National Children's Hospital
"Antibiotic treatment of bacterial vaginosis to prevent preterm birth: an IPD meta-analysis with imputation of missing studies"
Jenna Kanner, NIH
"Ambient temperature and acute risk of stillbirth"


SPC Business Meeting

Session Chair(s):  
Date: 2019-06-19       Time: 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm
Location: Minnehaha


     

Come meet your current and newly elected SPC members to hear about SPC activities over the past year and learn about opportunities to get involved. The business meeting is open to all students and post-docs. Stay for the annual SPC raffle for a chance to win books and other epidemiology-themed items!

Session Chairs:
,




Breakfast with the Experts

Session Chair(s):  
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 7:00 am - 12:00 am
Location:


     

TICKETED EVENT – REGISTRATION REQUIRED This early morning roundtable session will take place for one hour before Thursday’s opening Plenary Sessions. Senior SER colleagues will lead discussion groups on topics based on their areas of expertise, a specific topic in epidemiology, or potential advice on career development and advancement. These sessions provide an excellent opportunity for you to meet the experts of our science. Grab breakfast before you come!

Session Chairs:
,


Discussants:
Maya Peterson, UC Berkeley
Allison Aiello, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Matthew Fox, Boston University
George Maldonado, University of Minnesota


Plenary 2 (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   Enrique Schisterman
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 8:00 am - 9:30 am
Location: Nicollet ABC


     



Session Chairs:
Enrique Schisterman,


Presenters:
Sandro Galea, Boston University
"Reconciling social epidemiology and causal inference"
Miguel Hernan, Harvard University
"Reconciling social epidemiology and causal inference"
Brittany Blouin, McGill University
"Using Bayesian methods to adjust for exposure misclassification in a mediation analysis with multiple mediators: The role of hemoglobin levels and malnutrition in the association between Ascaris infection and IQ scores"
Matthieu Domenech de Celles, Pasteur Institute
"Unraveling the Seasonal Epidemiology of Pneumococcus"


Potential Impacts of Policies on Population Health (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   Lorna Thorpe
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Location: Nicollet D3


     



Session Chairs:
Lorna Thorpe, New York University


Presenters:
Deborah Karasek, University of California, San Francisco
"The Effect of Timing of Earned Income Tax Credit Refunds on Preterm Birth"
Alvaro Castillo-Carniglia,
"Inconsistent effect on background checks of newly-enacted comprehensive background check policies in 4 US states"
Hawazin Elani, Harvard University
"Changes in Emergency Department Dental Visits after Medicaid Expansion"
Lindsay Kobayashi, Georgetown University
"Effects of the Affordable Care Act Medicaid expansion on subjective well-being: quasi-experimental evidence from the United States adult population"
Gabriela Vazquez Benitez, HealthPartners
"Safety of Guidelines Recommending LAIV for Routine Use in Children and Adolescents with Asthma"


Environmental Health:  Measurement and outcomes (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   Pauline Mendola
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Location: Nicollet A


     



Session Chairs:
Pauline Mendola, National Institute of Health


Presenters:
Joan Casey, University of California, Berkeley
"Why error propagation might matter: the case of area-level noise pollution and health in the United States"
Danielle N. Medgyesi, NIH
"Residential mobility and misclassification of environmental exposures in a prospective cohort"
Molly Rosenberg, Indiana University Bloomington
"Hurricane exposure microfinance and key infectious diseases in Haiti"
Edmond Shenassa, The University of Maryland
"Air pollution poverty and cardiometabolic dysfunction among United States adolescents"
Marion Ouidir, NIH
"Persistent organic pollutants exposure during early pregnancy and longitudinal fetal growth in the NICHD Fetal Growth Studies - Singletons"
Akhgar Ghassabian, NYU Langone Health
"Exposure to Traffic-related Air Pollution and Thyroid Dysfunction during Pregnancy: A Multi-cohort Study"


Firearms and Substance Use: Informing Policy to Prevent Injury and Violence

Session Chair(s):   Rose Kagawa
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Location: Lakeshore A


     



Session Chairs:
Rose Kagawa, University of California, Davis


Presenters:
Vivian Lyons, University of Washington
"Efficacy of a Behavioral Intervention Among Patients with Gunshot Wounds: A Comparison of Analytic Methods"
Ashley M. Hernandez, University of Minnesota
"Prevalence of "Responsible Selling" Tendencies in An Online Firearms Marketplace"
Veronica A. Pear, University of California, Davis
"Armed and Prohibited: Characteristics of Legal Firearm Purchasers in California Who Subsequently Become Prohibited Persons"
Aaron Shev, University of California, Davis
"Non-violent misdemeanors as a risk factor for future arrest for violent crime among hand gun purchasers"
Spruha Joshi, University of Minnesota
"Patterns of Medical Marijuana and Alcohol Laws and the Association with Traffic Fatalities 1987-2017"
David S. Fink, Columbia University
"Driving under the influence of alcohol or cannabis in the United Statesc: Relationship to state medical marijuana laws"


Understanding, improving, population mental health

Session Chair(s):   Sandro Galea
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Location: Nicollet BC


     



Session Chairs:
Sandro Galea, Boston University


Presenters:
Eva Raphael, University of California, San Francisco
"Estimating the effect of neighborhood deprivation on mental health among refugees and non-refugee immigrants to Sweden: a natural experiment"
Salma M. Abdalla, Boston University
"Mitigating the mental health consequences of mass shootings: an in-silico experiment"
Megan Richards,
"Food Insecurity and Antepartum Depression in the National Children's Study"
Julia Raifman, Boston University
"Changes in Age of Handgun Purchase Policies and Adolescent Suicide Fatalities in the United States"
Bizu Gelaye, Harvard University
"Associations of maternal trauma experiences with offspring behavioral problems: Findings from the PrOMIS cohort study"
Ava Hamilton, Columbia University
"Age period and cohort effects of loneliness self-esteem and self-derogation among adolescents from 1991-2016"


Methodological issues for reproductive epidemiologic research

Session Chair(s):   Brian Whitcomb
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Location: Nicollet D1


     



Session Chairs:
Brian Whitcomb, University of Massachusetts


Presenters:
Yu-Han Chiu, Harvard University
"Dealing with competing events in the estimation of the health effects of fertility treatment on the offspring"
Elizabeth A. DeVilbiss, NIH
"Prediction of pregnancy loss by vaginal bleeding and nausea patterns in early pregnancy: prospective cohort nested within a randomized controlled trial"
Neil Perkins,
"Evaluating methods to handle missing pregnancy indication: If she gave birth was she pregnant?"
Jeremy A. Labrecque, Erasmus MC
"Target trial emulation in perinatal epidemiology: applications in the Generation R Study"
Sonia M. Grandi, McGill University
"Implications of the choice of sample population for the development of risk prediction models for long-term outcomes incorporating pregnancy-related predictors"


Cancer Screening

Session Chair(s):   Steven Stovitz
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Location: Lakeshore B


     



Session Chairs:
Steven Stovitz, University of Minnesota


Presenters:
Talia Malagon, McGill University
"Do the benefits of cervical cancer screening outweigh its harms: a decision modeling analysis comparing measures of harms and benefits of screening with cytology and HPV testing"
Lauren Wise, Boston University
"A prospective study of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia its treatments and fecundability"
Andreas Stang, Essen University Hospital
"Trends in surgical treatment for breast cancer in Germany after the implementation of the mammography screening program"
Elizabeth Polter, University of Minnesota Twin Cities
"Associations between serum inflammatory biomarkers and colorectal cancer incidence in the Singapore Chinese Health Study (SCHS)"
Ellen M. Mikkelson, Institut for Klinisk Medicin
"Can we screen more precisely for colorectal cancer?"
Esther K. Wei, Harvard University
"Accounting for endoscopic screening in colorectal cancer risk prediction models"


Risk factors for Alzheimer's Disease and cognitive loss

Session Chair(s):   David Jacobs
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Location: Nicollet D2


     



Session Chairs:
David Jacobs, University of Minnesota


Presenters:
Erica Reinhard, King's College London
"The impact of public transportation use on cognitive function in older age: A quasi-experimental evaluation of the free bus pass policy in the UK"
Xiaoyu Li, Harvard University
"Association of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder with all-cause mortality among older disaster survivors of the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami"
Yian Gu, Columbia University
"Current and past physical activity and risk of Alzheimer’s disease: a longitudinal study"
Anusha Vable, University of California, San Francisco
"Differential returns to education by sociodemographic subgroup in predicting rate of memory decline"
Claudia Kimie Suemoto, University of Sao Paulo Medical School
"Association between GlycA and cognitive function "results from the ELSA" Brasil"
Dominika Seblova,
"Educational inequalities in survival after dementia diagnosis"


"Who wants to be an Epidemiologist?" Gameshow

Session Chair(s):   Ian Shrier
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: Nicollet BC


     

This is the 3rd edition of Who wants to be an epidemiologist? A contestant from the audience chooses from one of the four possible answers to each question. The 3 judges will then explain the correct and incorrect answers. Contestants choosing the correct answer continue to play or they are replaced by another audience member. Each contestant has three “lifelines” (ask the audience, ask a friend, 50-50 choice). To increase edutainment, we include controversial questions with more than one correct answer, but only one “official” best answer. Contestants can challenge questions but if they are incorrect (i.e. an inappropriate challenge), the contestant is replaced with another audience member. To maximize participation, audience members may challenge a contestant’s answer. If correct, the audience member becomes the new contestant, or gets to choose which other audience member will become the new contestant. Other surprises await.

Session Chairs:
Ian Shrier, McGill University


Discussants:
Jay Kaufman, McGill University
Jennifer Weuve, Boston University
Katherine Keyes, Columbia University


SPC Career Panel

Session Chair(s):  
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: Nicollet D1


     

More information coming soon!

Session Chairs:
,




Career pathways for masters-level epidemiologists (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   Erin Bowles,   Rachel Ross
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: Nicollet D3


     

This session will highlight potential career opportunities for epidemiologists with a master’s degree. This career panel will include 4 masters-level professionals who are current SER members and actively using epidemiology in their daily work. The panelists will give a brief overview of their career pathways, their work, and potential career paths for masters-level epidemiologists in their work setting. The overview will be followed by a facilitated Q&A session. This session is open to all members. We hope it will highlight the value of masters-level professionals to epidemiology research, and encourage an untapped group of potential new members to join and feel welcome at SER.

Session Chairs:
Erin Bowles, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute
Rachel Ross, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill


Presenters:
Janis Breeze,
"Master's-level career at an academic medical center"
Tess Gilbert,
"Masters-level career at the VA"
Lisa Moy,
"Masters-level career at an integrated healthcare system"
Elizabeth Best,
"Masters-level career at a consulting company"


SER goes international - Epidemiology in Chile (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   Veronica Iglesias
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Location: Nicollet A


     

The purpose of this symposium is to offer a review of epidemiological research developed in Chile in the last 20 years. We will show a panorama of the efforts in advanced training in epidemiology developed in the School of Public Health (Verónica Iglesias) and focus on epidemiological research carried out on cardiovascular diseases (Carolina Nazzal), environmental epidemiology (Karla Yohannessen) and obesity preventive policies (Cristóbal Cuadrado). We aim at identifying areas of common interest and possibilities for academic collaboration.

Session Chairs:
Veronica Iglesias, Universidad de Chile


Presenters:
Veronica Iglesias, University of Chile
"Advance training in epidemiological research in Chile: challenges and opportunities"
Carolina Nazzal, University of Chile
"Cardiovascular disease epidemiology research in Chile"
Karla Yohannessen, University of Chile
"Environmental epidemiology: Respiratory health of asthmatic and non-asthmatic children and short-term exposure to air pollution, PM2.5 composition and source factors in Santiago, Chile"
Cristobal Cuadrado, University of Chile
"Epidemiological research to support obesity preventive policies in Chile"


Future of Epidemiology: Emerging Trends and Perspectives

Session Chair(s):   Andrew Olshan,   Brooke Anderson
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 2:15 pm - 3:45 pm
Location: Nicollet D1


     

Building upon the ongoing collaboration between the Society for Epidemiologic Research and American Journal of Epidemiology collaboration on the future of epidemiology, we propose a symposium that addresses emerging and innovative issues in our field with a perspective on our discipline’s vision for the future of research, practice, and training. The symposium will feature commentaries solicited for a special SER-AJE issue on the “Future of Epidemiology”, addressing the most critical areas for our field and for public health including the role of observational epidemiology, systems modeling, climate change, emerging infections, the nature of our profession, and social factors. Thought leaders in these areas will provide a brief current state-of-knowledge overview, followed by specific future priorities, challenges and recommendations, including a focus on training. The symposium will end with a panel question-and-answer session including all the speakers.

Session Chairs:
Andrew Olshan, University of North Carolina
Brooke Anderson, Colorado State University


Presenters:
Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, University of California, San Francisco
"Future of Epidemiology: What is the future of observational epidemiology?"
Magdalena Cerda, New York University
"Future of Epidemiology: Systems modeling"
Brooke Anderson, Colorado State University
"Future of Epidemiology: Climate Epidemiology"
Allison Aiello, University of North Carolina
"Future of Epidemiology: An outlook on measurement and methods for studying social determinants"
Art Reingold, University of California, Berkeley
"Future of Epidemiology: Future of Epidemiology: Infectious Disease Epidemiology in the 21st Century"


iEpidemiology: Innovative exposure and outcome assessment using advanced technologies

Session Chair(s):   Keewan Kim,   Carrie Nobles
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 2:15 pm - 3:45 pm
Location: Lakeshore B


     

Given the diversity of exposures and their complex interactions, the need for new methods of exposure assessment is a pressing concern. We feel this symposium would be of interest to SER members given the need to accurately identify exposures during critical windows of susceptibility in the field of epidemiology. New technologies (e.g., smartphone app) are being developed to more accurately and precisely capture personal exposures to a range of health factors, including physical activity, reproductive, and environmental exposures. The goal of this symposium is to introduce new technologies being implemented in the field. Furthermore, we aim to foster a discussion of the potential to learn new methods across various disciplines and the costs/benefits of incorporating emerging technologies for exposure/outcome assessment into research studies.

Session Chairs:
Keewan Kim, NICHD
Carrie Nobles, NICHD


Presenters:
Danielle Bradley,
"Leveraging data collected using a digital mobile app to improve women’s health: the Ovia Health experience"
Christina Troutner,
"HealthWatch 360: Mobile app for population and interventional nutrition research"
Marc Epstein,
"A new tool for epidemiological research: MyExposome silicone wristbands"


Open Epidemiology, Data Transparency and Reproducibility: An egg that can’t be unbroken

Session Chair(s):   Neal Goldstein
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 2:15 pm - 3:45 pm
Location: Nicollet D2


     

Increasingly the field of epidemiology is moving towards an open science paradigm: a barrier free approach to sharing data and analyses. Yet given the current environment of public health and the nature of epidemiological data, an open epidemiological framework faces specific challenges before it is routinely employed in the evidence base for public health policy and decision making. New technology, such as data sharing platforms, combined with a culture of transparency may in fact expand our ability to identify new public health solutions faster. While other scientific disciplines have embraced the open science concept, epidemiologist have argued that our data are not necessarily amenable to sharing and a focus on reproducibility detracts from methodological advancement. This symposium will tackle these broad challenges by framing the controversy, discussing solutions and methods towards open epidemiology, and concluding with a collaborative discussion of the way forward.

Session Chairs:
Neal Goldstein, Drexel University


Presenters:
Tim Lash, Emory University
"Open Data: Ideology Meets Reality"
Tonya White, Erasmus Medical Center
"Overcoming obstacles for data sharing within epidemiological research: Hey, it’s my data!"
Bryan Shepherd, Vanderbilt University
"A pragmatic approach for reproducible research with sensitive data"
Harrison Quick, Drexel University
"Using spatiotemporal models to generate synthetic data for public use"
Discussants:
Tyler VanderWeele, Harvard University


Genetic Epidemiology in the Causal Era: How Do Genes Affect the Health of Populations and How do we Know?

Session Chair(s):   Jay Kaufman,   Stephanie London
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 2:15 pm - 3:45 pm
Location: Nicollet BC


     

Check out the Mini SERplaylist for this session: https://epiresearch.org/serlibrary/serplaylists/ The most significant revolutions in epidemiology over the last 3 decades have been the rise of formal causal reasoning in design and analysis and the growing hegemony of genetic epidemiology over scientific hypotheses and funding. But how do these two paradigms intersect?  What does formal causal reasoning tell us about how to study the effects of genetic variants, and how do concepts such as confounding, selection and information biases apply?   Are SNPs well-defined exposures? Can “Genome-Wide Association Studies” yield causally interpretable effects when they do not necessarily snag causal variants? This symposium will explore and debate population stratification, estimating and interpreting genetic risk scores as exposures, causal effect interpretation under environmental heterogeneity, and other challenges of designing and interpreting studies of the causal effects of variations in DNA sequence.  It’s time to put nature and nurture into the same DAG.

Session Chairs:
Jay Kaufman, McGill University
Stephanie London, NIEHS


Presenters:
Peter Kraft, Harvard University
"Genetic epidemiology as an art of the possible: design and interpretation of genetic association studies"
Christy Avery, UNC
"How studying racially/ethnically diverse populations informs causal inference."
John Witte, UCSF
"Polygenic risk scores: prediction without causality"
Brandon Pierce, University of Chicago
"Studying biological mechanisms of genetic susceptibility using causal reasoning"
Discussants:
Stephanie London, NIEHS


Triangulation of Causal Effect Estimates (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   Jeremy Labrecque
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 2:15 pm - 3:45 pm
Location: Nicollet A


     

Causal effect estimation is typically conducted within the scope of one study, and inferences need to be interpreted with respect to that study’s strengths, limitations and underlying assumptions. Causal inferences can be strengthened by leveraging multiple approaches that require different assumptions or that have different strengths and limitations. This practice, referred to as triangulation, is an ideal part of all scientific endeavors. However, it is often not highlighted in epidemiologic training or in research. In this symposium we will discuss the role of triangulation in our own research lines. Real epidemiologic examples will be emphasized, including applications in studying maternal pregnancy exposures, HIV treatment, Alzheimer's disease and dementia, and cardiovascular disease.

Session Chairs:
Jeremy Labrecque, Erasmus MC


Presenters:
Jeremy Labrecque,
"Using counterfactuals to formalize triangulation"
Debbie Lawlor,
"Using triangulation to explore causal effects of maternal exposures on offspring outcomes"
Catherine Oldenburg,
"Regression discontinuity and inverse probability weighting methods to estimate causal effects in HIV epidemiology"
Maria Glymour,
"Triangulation in Alzheimer’s disease and dementia research"


Spotlight on aging in postmenopausal women: Twenty-five years of research in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI)

Session Chair(s):   Hailey Banack
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 2:15 pm - 3:45 pm
Location: Lakeshore A


     

Since 1993, the WHI has focused on understanding the major causes of morbidity and mortality in older women. The study has made seminal contributions to our knowledge of health outcomes in postmenopausal women, perhaps most notably highlighting the risks associated with hormone replacement therapy. At its inception, the WHI was innovative because it represented the first cohort study of postmenopausal women, who, at the time, were an underrepresented group in scientific research. This symposium will feature research by the ‘next generation’ of WHI investigators. In addition to presentations by a diverse group of early career investigators, the symposium will include a discussion of findings from 25 years of research in women’s health by senior WHI investigators and present opportunities for epidemiologists use the WHI data. The symposium is relevant to the membership of SER because the WHI is a landmark epidemiologic study and an incredibly rich resource for research on women’s health.

Session Chairs:
Hailey Banack, University at Buffalo


Presenters:
Andrew Odegaard,
"Leveraging old data for new insight into the obesity-cardiometabolic health relationship"
Wendy Barrington,
"Diving deeper into racial disparities: unique opportunities in WHI"
John Bellettiere,
"Using intensive longitudinal measures of body movement to study the link between sedentary behaviors and incident CVD, diabetes and mortality"
Hailey Banack,
"Can small bugs create big problems? Understanding the relationship between the microbiome and aging in postmenopausal women."
Discussants:
JoAnn Mason,
Jean Wactawski-Wende,


Beyond “Is race a cause?” – Bringing Critical Race Theory into Epidemiology (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   John Pamplin II,   Zinzi Bailey
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 2:15 pm - 3:45 pm
Location: Nicollet D3


     

Conversations about race at SER often rehash outmoded debates about whether race can be considered a cause under the Potential Outcomes framework. While acknowledging that race is socially constructed, causal questions are nonetheless framed around the possibility of estimating intervention effects of race, which implicitly or explicitly devolve into biological essentialism. The absence of a shared theoretical foundation for conceptualizing race and racism may contribute to this inconsistency. Fortunately, Critical Race Theory, a framework that has animated research in other social sciences for over three decades, has begun to make its way into quantitative health research. The proposed symposium will introduce Critical Race Theory to epidemiologists and feature research informed by this approach. The goal of the symposium is to move past old debates, and explore how Critical Race Theory can inform causal links between racism and disease in epidemiology.

Session Chairs:
John Pamplin II, Columbia University
Zinzi Bailey, University of Miami


Presenters:
Chandra Ford,
"If Race is not Biology, What is it?: Racialization, Social Constructs and Epidemiology"
Zinzi Bailey,
"The Potential of Critical Race Theory in Epidemiology: Using Historical Imagination to Construct Counterfactual Racial Formation and Dynamics"
Sharrelle Barber,
"Embodying Racism: Empirical Evidence from the United States and Brazil"
Discussants:
John Pamplin, Columbia University


Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology: Innovative Methods and Novel Risk Factors

Session Chair(s):   Ryan Demmer
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 4:15 pm - 5:45 pm
Location: Nicollet BC


     



Session Chairs:
Ryan Demmer, University of Minnesota


Presenters:
Emily D'Agostino, Miami Dade College
"Longitudinal Population-Level Health-Related Fitness Patterns in New York City Public School Children and Adolescents 2006-2017"
Sumith Roy, Columbia University
"Plasma Trimethylamine-N-Oxide and Impaired Glucose Regulation: Results from The Oral Infections Glucose Intolerance and Insulin Resistance Study (ORIGINS)"
Shiu Lun Au Yeung, University of Hong Kong
"The impact of growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) on coronary artery disease breast and colorectal cancer risk: A Mendelian randomization study"
Wendy Wang, University of Minnesota
"Association of Life's Simple 7 with Atrial Fibrillation Burden in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study"
Jessica Laine, Imperial College London
"Cross-omics mediation in Epidemiology: Moving beyond biomarkers and into molecular mechanisms"
Rob Walker, University of Minnesota
"Testosterone Therapy and Risk of Venous Thromboembolism Among Men Without Hypogonadism"


A selection of selection bias talks: understanding and addressing selection bias in theory and practice (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   Ellie Murray,   Penelope Howards
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 4:15 pm - 5:45 pm
Location: Nicollet A


     



Session Chairs:
Ellie Murray, Harvard University
Penelope Howards, Emory University


Presenters:
Haidong Lu, University of North Carolina
"Toward a clearer definition of selection bias"
Lindsey M. Duca, UC Denver
"Bias from incomplete case ascertainment in studies examining the transition from pediatric to adult-centered cardiac care in young adults with congenital heart disease: Results from the Colorado Congenital Heart Disease (COCHD) surveillance system"
Louisa H. Smith, Harvard University
"Simple Sensitivity Analysis for Selection Bias"
Paul N. Zivich, University of North Carolina
"An Inverse Probability Weighting Approach to Correct for Left Truncation"
Matthew Tudball, University of Bristol
"An interval estimation approach for selection bias in IV studies"


Sex Differences in Epidemiology

Session Chair(s):   Stephen Gilman
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 4:15 pm - 5:45 pm
Location: Lakeshore B


     



Session Chairs:
Stephen Gilman, National Institute of Health


Presenters:
Carrie Nobles, NIH
"Ambient air pollution during preconception and peri-implantation and odds of male versus female live birth"
Erica Reinhard, King's College London
"The impact of household socioeconomic changes during the Great Recession on children's biomarkers"
Karishma Furtado, Washington University in St. Louis
"Considering Race Gender Disability and the Discipline Gap"
Holly Elser, Stanford University
"Workplace gender composition and treatment for depression among blue-collar workers in the U.S. aluminum industry"
Yueh-Ying Han, University Pittsburgh Medical Center
"Sex steroid hormones and asthma in a nationwide study of US adults"
Tarek M. Zikry, University of North Carolina
"The effect of neighborhood perception on the divergence between chronological and DNA methylation age"


Nutrition and Obesity (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   Dianne Neumark-Sztainer
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 4:15 pm - 5:45 pm
Location: Nicollet D3


     



Session Chairs:
Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, University of Minnesota


Presenters:
Stephanie A. Leonard, Stanford University
"The Roles of Maternal Comorbidities and Cesarean Birth in the Association between Prepregnancy Body Mass Index and Severe Maternal Morbidity"
Samrawit F. Yisahak, NIH
"Association of Maternal Vegetarian Diets with Neonatal Anthropometry in the NICHD Fetal Growth Study"
Alexandra C. Purdue-Smithe, NIH
"Caffeinated beverage intake and serum caffeine metabolites and risk of pregnancy loss"
Ayaz Hyder, The Ohio State University
"Examining Disparities in Food Accessibility among Households in Columbus Ohio: An Agent-Based Model"
Cynthia Yoon, University of Minnesota
"Disordered Eating Behaviors and 15-year Trajectories in Body Mass Index: Findings from Project EAT"
Alison Cammack, Emory University
"History of Childhood Maltreatment and Obesogenic Behaviors In Early Adulthood"


Impact of novel risk factors on women’s health across the lifecourse

Session Chair(s):   Dale Sandler,   Alexandra White
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 4:15 pm - 5:45 pm
Location: Nicollet D1


     



Session Chairs:
Dale Sandler, National Institute of Health
Alexandra White, National Institute of Health


Presenters:
Sabine Oskar, Columbia University
"Identifying environmental agent profiles associated with early menarche among U.S. adolescent girls: A machine learning approach"
Tianyi Huang, Harvard University
"Association of early abuse with plasma metabolomics in middle-aged women"
Timothy Ihongbe, Virgina Commonwealth University
"The modifying effect of social support on the association between neighborhood violence exposure and preterm birth"
Amelia K. Wesselink, Boston University
"A prospective ultrasound study of cigarette smoking and risk of uterine leiomyoma"
Christine R. Langton, University of Massachusetts
"Oral contraceptive use and incidence of early natural menopause"
Yiska Loewenberg Weisband, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
"The association between women's inter-birth intervals and cardiovascular mortality"


Substance use epidemiology with policy implications

Session Chair(s):   Pia Mauro
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 4:15 pm - 5:45 pm
Location: Nicollet D2


     



Session Chairs:
Pia Mauro, Columbia University


Presenters:
Yanmin Zhu, Harvard University
"Opioid Prescription Use After Vaginal Delivery and Subsequent Persistent Opioid Use and Misuse"
Lindsay Pearce, British Columbia Centre
"Mortality among a population-based cohort of treated people with opioid use disorders following declaration of a public health emergency on opioid overdose in British Columbia Canada"
Rachel E. Gicquelais, Johns Hopkins University
"The Role of Drugs in Alcohol Overdose: A Latent Class Analysis among Patients in Residential Addiction Treatment in Michigan 2014-2016"
Gregory H. Cohen, Boston University
"Do Tobacco Taxes Affect Coronary Heart Disease Mortality Rates Differentially Among Black Compared to White Americans?"
Thomas P. Ahern, The University of Vermont
"Impact of State Policy on Opioid Prescribing After Common Surgical Procedures"
Michelle L. Nolan, NYC Health
"Understanding the effect of syringe service programs on neighborhood crime complaint rates in New York City"


Occupational epidemiology

Session Chair(s):   John Beard
Date: 2019-06-20       Time: 4:15 pm - 5:45 pm
Location: Lakeshore A


     



Session Chairs:
John Beard, Brigham Young University


Presenters:
Lydia Feinstein, Social and Scientific Systems
"Mortality Among Oil Spill Response and Clean-up Workers 1-6 years Following the Deepwater Horizon Disaster"
Kaitlyn B. Gam, NIH
"Lung function in oil spill responders 4-6 years after the Deepwater Horizon disaster"
Jacqueline Ferguson, University of California, Berkeley
"Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Mortality: The Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study (DEMS)"
Nnaemeka U. Odo, University of Minnesota
"Health Effects of Silica in the Setting of Mixed Dust Exposures in Taconite Mining"
Gabriella Andreotti, NIH
"Occupational Pesticide Use and Risk of Renal Cell Carcinoma in the Agricultural Health Study"
Miriam Siegel, CDC
"Maternal Occupational Oil Mist Exposure and Birth Defects - United States 1997-2011"


Plenary 3 (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   Martha Werler
Date: 2019-06-21       Time: 8:00 am - 9:30 am
Location: Nicollet ABC


     



Session Chairs:
Martha Werler, Boston University


Presenters:
Sherman James, Duke University (Public Policy) and Emory University (Epidemiology)
"My African American Journey as an Epidemiologist"
Lauren McCullough, Emory University
"In our backyard: building a career addressing disparities in breast cancer mortality"
Allison Aiello, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
"Testing the limits of mitigation measures for an influenza pandemic"
Jill Norris, University of Colorado, Denver
"Noel Weiss & Tom Koepsell Excellence in Education Award Winner"


Family Matters: using family designs to control confounding in observational studies

Session Chair(s):   Mollie Wood,   Katherine Keyes
Date: 2019-06-21       Time: 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Location: Nicollet D1


     

Family-based study designs are methods that leverage shared, time-stable familial factors to reduce confounding, both known sources of confounding that are difficult to measure, such as genetics and personality, and unknown confounders. The collection of data linking health information within families is proliferating, which has led to a rapid uptake in the epidemiologic literature. However, the assumptions for casual identification using family-based designs are often unarticulated, and these designs are vulnerable to biases from nonshared confounders and measurement error, indeed in some cases more so than designs of unrelated persons. This symposium brings together perspectives from epidemiology, statistics, and behavioral genetics to illustrate the promises and pitfalls of family designs for epidemiological research. The proposed format includes an overview of family methods, followed by three talks from researchers working with these study designs, with ample time for discussion.

Session Chairs:
Mollie Wood, Harvard School of Public Health
Katherine Keyes, Columbia University


Presenters:
Mollie Wood,
"The Anna Karenina Principle in family designs"
Jackie Cohen,
"Paternal medication use as a negative control exposure for pregnancy drug safety studies"
Thomas Frisell,
"Introducing or amplifying bias by using sibling controls: a cautionary note"
Matt McGue,
"On subject of methods concerns in twin designs"
Discussants:
Katherine Keyes,


Is it my brain or my senses? Measuring and interpreting cognitive function in the context of sensory deficit.

Session Chair(s):   Alison Abraham,   Bonnie Swenor
Date: 2019-06-21       Time: 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Location: Lakeshore B


     

Over the past decade, research examining the relationship between sensory impairment and cognitive function has expanded. However, the sensory-cognitive relationship is complex: while there is mounting evidence that sensory impairments are a risk factor for cognitive decline in older adults, the observed sensory-cognitive relationships may also be driven by common causes of late-life cognitive decline and sensory impairment. Moreover, measuring cognitive function using tests that rely on auditory and/or visual presentation may be problematic in individuals with hearing and/or vision impairments.

Session Chairs:
Alison Abraham, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
Bonnie Swenor, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine


Presenters:
Frank Lin,
"Do I really need to worry about this and why? Understanding the relationship between sensory impairment and cognitive outcomes"
Bonnie Swenor,
"Apples and oranges. Inconsistencies in assessing cognitive functioning in individuals with sensory impairment"
Jennifer Deal,
"Who gets tested? Selection issues and missing data in cognitive function testing in individuals with sensory impairment"
Aiden Gross,
"What am I measuring? Disentangling cognitive status from sensory impairment"
Walter Wittich,
"The horizon: how to get better at assessing cognitive function in individuals with sensory impairment"


Population-based inter-generational studies (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   Enrique Schisterman
Date: 2019-06-21       Time: 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Location: Nicollet D3


     

Animal studies show that numerous chemical and environmental exposures, such as endocrine disruptors (EDCs), act via epigenetic reprogramming of the germline, and thus may have multi- or inter-generational. Given the myriad EDCs people are exposed to every day (e.g. pesticides and common plastics), and with increased access to large cohorts that include multiple generations, a new wave of epidemiologic studies to better understand the impacts of these exposures on future generations is emerging. In this session 3 speakers will present on cutting-edge research on inter-generational exposure effects in population-based studies. The first two will present recently-conducted substantive studies of: (1) in-utero maternal caffeine intake and ovarian reserve in adult offspring; and, (2) smoking during pregnancy and ADHD in grandchildren. The third talk will be on methodological considerations/challenges in the analysis of population-based inter-generational studies, along with some solutions.

Session Chairs:
Enrique Schisterman,


Presenters:
Sunni Mumford,
"Inter-generational effects of maternal dietary and lifestyle behaviors on reproductive health of the offspring"
Gyenyoon Yim, Harvard University
"Multi-generational association between smoking during pregnancy and ADHD"
Sebastien Haneuse, Harvard University
"Methodological considerations and challenges in the analysis of population-based inter-generational studies."


The baddest of the bad: Ranking the most pernicious biases facing observational studies (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   Catherine Lesko,   Matthew Fox
Date: 2019-06-21       Time: 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Location: Nicollet A


     

There are many threats to the generation of valid and precise knowledge useful for improving population health. Because the metaphysical, physical, practical and mental resources available to epidemiologists are limited to draw inference, epidemiologists tend to focus on a limited number of sources of bias when prioritizing resources. Furthermore, (when done) sensitivity analyses tend to focus on one source of bias at a time. Within any one study, one source of bias may dominate, but this symposium will consist of debate-style presentations that address which source of bias is the most commonly present but un- or under-addressed threat to validity in epidemiologic research. We will include ample time for discussion and interaction between the audience and speaker panel. We will use online voting programs (PollEverywhere.com) to assess pre- and post- discussion ranking of threats to valid inference.

Session Chairs:
Catherine Lesko, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health
Matthew Fox, Boston University


Presenters:
Robert Platt,
"Misalignment of person-time (inappropriate time 0, immortal person-time, etc)"
Maria Glymour,
"Residual confounding or unmeasured confounders"
Matthew Fox,
"Information Bias"
Jessie Edwards,
"Missing Data"
Ashley Naimi,
"Model Misspecification"
Chanelle Howe,
"Selection Bias"
Catherine Lesko,
"Lack of Generalizability"
Discussants:
Jay Kaufman,


Saving lives as an off-target effect: the impact of economic and social policies on population health

Session Chair(s):   Anjum Hajat,   Steve Mooney
Date: 2019-06-21       Time: 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Location: Nicollet BC


     

Public health researchers have focused on individual and community based health interventions to improve population health. Although often effective, these interventions may not scale to benefit the full population. Exploring the impacts of policies is an alternative approach that may yield wide-reaching health improvement.

Session Chairs:
Anjum Hajat, University of Washington
Steve Mooney, University of Washington


Presenters:
James Buszkiewic, University of Washington
"Effects of minimum wage increases on health and health behavior in working-age-adults"
Nathan Nickel, University of Manitoba
"Health impacts of an unconditional prenatal cash transfer in the Canadian province of Manitoba"
Pia Mauro, Columbia University
"Age differences in the effects of medical and recreational marijuana laws across the US"
Jennifer Ahern, University of California, Berkeley
"Local policy and firearm violence: A quasi-experimental study of the Operation Peacemaker Fellowship in Richmond, California"
Discussants:
Arjumand Siddiqi, University of Toronto


PrEPidemiology: innovations in methods for biomedical HIV-prevention research

Session Chair(s):   Julia Marcus
Date: 2019-06-21       Time: 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Location: Nicollet D2


     

With 5000 new HIV infections each day worldwide, HIV-prevention strategies are a public health priority. Antiretroviral preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP), typically a once-daily pill, is up to 99% effective in preventing HIV acquisition. However, PrEP uptake has been slow in high-priority populations, potentially limiting its impact at a population level. This session will highlight innovations in methods for biomedical HIV-prevention research, including novel approaches to optimize PrEP implementation and measure its impact. Specific topics include the use of traditional and machine learning approaches to identify PrEP candidates in settings with low and high HIV incidence; estimation of the population-level effects of PrEP on incidence of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, using both mathematical modeling and emulation of randomized trials in observational data; and the creative use of clinical trials data to estimate the effectiveness of emerging PrEP delivery methods.

Session Chairs:
Julia Marcus, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute


Presenters:
Julia Marcus, Harvard University
"PrEP implementation: challenges and opportunities"
Douglas Krakower, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
"Integrating electronic health record data to identify potential PrEP candidates in U.S. primary care settings"
Laura Balzer, University of Massachusetts Amherst
"Super learning vs. traditional approaches for population-based HIV risk assessment in rural East Africa"
Samuel Jenness, Emory University
"Innovations in methods and applications of mathematical modeling for HIV PrEP"
David Glidden, University of California, San Francisco
"Bridging clinical trials data to estimate public health impact for novel PrEP delivery methods"


Novel and innovative measures of fetal growth and development

Session Chair(s):   Anne Marie Jukic
Date: 2019-06-21       Time: 10:00 am - 11:30 am
Location: Lakeshore A


     

Fetal growth is relevant for understanding pregnancy outcomes, pediatric development, and, if the in utero origins of disease hypothesis is applied, subsequent adult health. Fetal growth is often characterized by size at birth, which is known to be misclassified. In recent years technological advances have allowed for more sophisticated measures and analytical techniques. However, controversy exists across clinical disciplines - maternal-fetal medicine, obstetrics, and pediatrics - regarding the most appropriate ways to measure and quantify fetal growth and development. Specifically, it is not clear 1) which fetal parameters should be measured, 2) what tools should be used for those measurements, 3) and how the data should be analyzed. This symposium will address each of these questions with presenters who are leaders in the field. Each of the following presenters would be allotted about 18 minutes with the final 18 minutes used for a panel-style summary/questions/discussion.

Session Chairs:
Anne Marie Jukic, NIEHS


Presenters:
Anne Eskild,
"Novel tools for measuring fetal and placental growth: 3D ultrasound as validated by MRI measurements"
Katherine Grantz,
"What to measure? Fetal growth and fetal growth velocity in relation to preterm delivery, preeclampsia and birthweight"
Russel Deter,
"Analyzing fetal growth data with Individualized Growth Assessment (IGA): A more accurate and sensitive method for detecting growth restriction"
Jason Gardosi,
"Why stop at birth? Building ethnically-diverse standards for fetal plus infant growth"


How to find a PostDoc (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   Maria Glymour
Date: 2019-06-21       Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: Nicollet BC


     

This round table discussion is intended to help doctoral students and recent graduates decide whether and how to pursue a post-doctoral fellowship. Facilitators include epidemiologists at different career stages and we will present our perspectives on the benefits and drawbacks of post-doctoral training programs. We will describe the relative merits of different types of post-doctoral positions (such as positions funded by T32 training grants vs. post-doctoral positions tied to specific research grants vs “named” post-docs). We will provide some suggestions on how to prepare a competitive post-doctoral application and what to consider when evaluating a post-doctoral fellowship, including mentorship, compensation, geography, flexibility, and other sources of scientific support.

Session Chairs:
Maria Glymour, University of California, San Francisco


Discussants:
Maria Glymour, UCSF
Enrique Schisterman,
Matt Kiang, Stanford University
Sharrelle Barber, Drexel University


Dissertation Survival Skills (*recording)

Session Chair(s):   Katherine Keyes
Date: 2019-06-21       Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: Nicollet D3


     

The dissertation process can be daunting. Deadlines, pressure, and the desire to make your mark on a research area. In this session, we will present a series of dissertation survival tips and tricks from investigators who have been there and done that. Topics will include: Choosing a manageable topic and scope for a dissertation; Applying for grants to support your dissertation work; Finding and getting access to data; Choosing mentors and committee; The writing process (e.g. how to structure your time, getting through roadblocks, managing and organizing literature to cite); Peer support (e.g. how to form a writing group and make it work); What do you do when life happens during your dissertation writing process (e.g. pregnancy, illness of self/family); Structuring how to effectively elicit feedback and comments from busy committee members; Preparing for your dissertation defense; Publishing your dissertation papers. Dissertations are survivable, and we are here to help you manage and thrive through the process.

Session Chairs:
Katherine Keyes, Columbia University


Discussants:
John Jackson, JHSPH
Katherine Keyes, Columbia University
Ashley Naimi, University of Pittsburgh
Holly Elser, UC Berkley
Chanelle Howe, Brown University


Diversity and Inclusion

Session Chair(s):   Martha Werler
Date: 2019-06-21       Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: Nicollet D2


     

How would you like to see epidemiology careers be diversified --- diversity of job opportunities, research interests, methods, study populations, background and experiences of the epidemiology workforce, something else? What can SER do to facilitate diversifying epidemiology career trajectories?

Session Chairs:
Martha Werler, Boston University


Discussants:
Salma Abdalla, Boston University
Francelyne Jean-Baptiste, University of Quebec
Elisa Jean-Baptiste, University of Montreal
Charles Branas, Columbia University
Yvette Cozier, Boston University


Ask Anything

Session Chair(s):   Chantel Martin,   Whitney Robinson
Date: 2019-06-21       Time: 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Location: Nicollet D1


     



Session Chairs:
Chantel Martin, UNC Chapel Hill
Whitney Robinson, UNC Chapel Hill


Discussants:
Dylan Galos, Amherst H. Wilder Foundation
Michael Oakes, University of Minnesota
M. Kumi Smith, University of Minnesota
Rachel Widome, University of Minnesota