Fertility Treatments and Long-Term Health: What We Know, and What We Wish We Knew

Fertility Treatments and Long-Term Health: What We Know, and What We Wish We Knew

In vitro fertilization (IVF) has led to the birth of more than 5 million babies worldwide, and less invasive fertility treatments have resulted in the birth of millions more. Many short-term maternal and infant health outcomes associated with fertility treatments, such as increased risk for preterm births and low birthweight, have been described; however researchers have struggled to assess the long-term health outcomes, especially given the potential effects of underlying subfertility.

The symposium’s main objectives are to discuss the available data sources and data analysis methods that can be used to increase understanding of the long-term outcomes of fertility treatments, present recent findings on some of these outcomes, and highlight additional data needs and areas deserving future research.

This topic is relevant for understanding the developmental origins of health and disease. The target audience is maternal/child health, environmental health, and cancer epidemiologists.

Session Chair:
Dmitry Kissin
, Centers for Disease Control
Germaine Buck Louis, NICHD, NIH

Presenters:
Sheree Boulet
, Centers for Disease Control
Christine Fountain, Fordham University
Edwina Yeung, NICHD, NIH
Barbara Luke, Michigan State University
Michael Davies, University of Adelaide

Discussant:
Dmitry Kissin, Centers for Disease Control